Digital Book Marketing eBook & Audio – Post the First – Audio #1

Aliensinthebackyard_500There are a lot of similarities between the marketing of an eBook, and the marketing of an audiobook, particularly if that audiobook is done as a digital download.  There are also huge differences.  Nearly everyone reads.  They might not do it by choice, but you just can’t get through life without it.  Listening to audiobooks is an acquired taste – an experience many have blockages against – prejudices preventing them from giving it a fair chance.  I wrote recently about not making smaller boxes out of those you already have for marketing.  Audiobooks are already constrained by their own box.  There are fewer listeners than readers, though the audience is growing slowly.

There are fewer large, commercial review outlets for audio.  The old-school audiobook community is a very literary community.  While there are big markets for genre audio, the real attention goes to celebrity and award-winning narrators, NYC commercial authors, and publishers with deep pockets.  Advertising, banquets, even a simple nomination for an award that is supposed to be for the best in the field – cost a lot of money. It’s an infrastructure built through the old publishing industry, where audio was expensive, very few titles were commercial enough to make it through the studio, and for those that were deeply involved, there was money enough to sustain all of the above.  There still is – at the top – but the business is expanding, and if those of us doing audio at a lower financial level are going to compete, we’re going to have to have a bigger boat, and we’ll have to build it ourselves.  Anyone know how to measure in cubits?

There is good news.  New review sites have cropped up.  There is a site – The Audiobook Jukebox – that aggregates reviews from other sites, and from blogs, and they index them for easy access.  ACX – the program that has made audio possible for so many that it was not possible for before – has made the acquisition of review copies easy, and they actively encourage promotion through social media, blogging, networking, and other means, and they are knowledgeable, incredibly helpful folks.

That said, don’t put down your tools.  We still need that boat and it has to be one big mother ICEBREAKER of a boat.  We have serious walls to break down, and it isn’t going to happen overnight.  I’m going to start with just a couple of points and see if we can work up some discussion.

1) Unless you have Deep pockets, do not concentrate your efforts on the old-school marketing techniques for audio.  It’s a tough sell, even if you get yourself involved, and it’s unlikely you will overcome the “editors choices” and sponsored titles unless you are independently wealthy.

2) Do not separate your audiobook marketing from your eBook and print book marketing. Amazon has a new program called whispersync.  While there are still pricing issues with this, encourage people to pick up the audio AND the eBook when you can.

3) Don’t be in too much of a hurry.  Study your book.  Figure out who would sound best doing it.  Research voice talent and cast the best possible voice.  This is critical.  As a publisher, I made a few bad mistakes early on, and those books have suffered.  Don’t skimp on editing.  Listen to your book if possible yourself, and if not, find someone else with the time to do it.  Test your voice talent across the range of characters.  When you offer a sample to be auditioned, try to include as much diversity in that sample as possible.

4) Include your audio – and if possible your narrator – in marketing material.  Talk about the experience of the audiobook while you are marketing.  interview the narrator if you get a chance.  In other words, network.

 

 

The old world of audio treated narrators the same way tie-in and licensed novel markets treat authors.  You do the work, they pat you on the back, and you move on to the next project.  The new paradigm calls for teamwork; it’s now possible for authors and narrators to share the risk, and the possible success, of a project.  For that to happen, you also have to share the marketing…it’s likely that if they are not a major voice talent, the narrator will have a smaller fan base – but listen up.  THEIR fan base all listens to audiobooks.  The odds are only a small percentage of an author’s fan base does the same.  Work together.  Be creative.  Try to do interviews, and always – ALWAYS include the synopsis, the audio sample, and (broken record again) one-click-to-buy link.

I open this to the floor but here is what I’m looking for.  What are good ways to get more people to listen to audiobooks? Where can we turn to market that is not being covered now? What is the key to building the new audiobook infrastructure – not trying to retool the small, stuffy box that surrounds audio now, but to build something big – new – part of the digital revolution?  More to follow shortly, upcoming video marketing tactics from https://themarketingheaven.com/shop/youtube-likes/ will enlighten you on some contemporary means of advertising anything these days with the luxury of video.

Next post will be a report on how some eBook promotions we have tried, and are trying, stack up – and why. You will notice that I have included two one-click-to-buy linked images in this post.  The first, Aliens in the Backyard, is currently our best-selling audio title at Crossroad Press.  This title will is narrated by Kevin Pierce, and will also be featured in that next post, so stay tuned.  Trish & Rob MacGregor have written a number of very cool books, fiction and non fiction, and run a blog where they talk about Synchronicity.   The second book – INTERMUSINGS – is a collection of stories that I’ve written over the years in collaboration with others.  My co-creators include Brian Hopkins, Patricia Lee Macomber, John B. Rosenman, Rich Rowand, Stephen Mark Rainey & Brett Alexander Savory.  The narrator – Mr. John Lee – is a world class talent and one of my all-time favorite narrators.  His rendering of the story in this collection “The Purloined Prose” is worth the price of the book.

INTERMUSINGS:

These stories represent decades of collaboration between author David Niall Wilson and a wide array of talented authors. All have been professionally published – some have been reprinted and collected. All are the result of two muses meeting on paper. Meet a modern day Don Quixote, fighting Y2K bug nightmares, and striving to save the woman of his dreams. Learn how Edgar Allen Poe might have found his tales. Face off on a lonely mountaintop with Lovecraftian nightmares. Join a young man in a ghostly race to save a relative from cancer. Follow a cross-wired detective in his hunt for a lycanthropic killer bent on ending every serial killer she encounters. See what might happen when two minds fall into “balance”.

What if Dr. Watson was the client…and someone who was dead – was not quite there? Visit a science-fiction future where artists capture images in crystals. What if government control over sex and reproduction got out of control? Listen as a piano man drops back into the nightmares of his past. Finally – a sailor on his way home finds a place even farther away than he ever dreamed.

These are the tales of Intermusings – previously published as Joined at the Muse. This new audio edition includes an Introduction by David Niall Wilson on the art of collaboration, and a sneak preview of the first chapter of the collaborative novel Hallowed Ground by Steven Savile & David Niall Wilson.

Contents include:

  • Introduction by David Niall Wilson
  • “A Poem of Adrian, Gray” – with Brian A. Hopkins
  • “The Purloined Prose” – with Patricia Lee Macomber
  • “A Wreath of Clouds” – with Stephen Mark Rainey
  • “Moon Like a Gambler’s Face” – with Ricard Rowand
  • “La Belle Dame, Sans Merci” – with Brian A. Hopkins
  • “La Belle Dame, Sans Regret” – with Brian A. Hopkins
  • “Ribbons of Darkness Over Me” – with Brett A. Savory
  • “Death Did Not Become Him” – with Patricia Lee Macomber
  • “Within an Image, Dancing” – with John B. Rosenman
  • “Virtue’s Mask” – with Brian A. Hopkins
  • “Sing a Song of Sixth Sense” – with Patricia Lee Macomber
  • “Deliver Us From Meeble” – with Brian Keene

AUDIO SAMPLE INTERMUSINGS

ALIENS IN THE BACKYARD:

In the early morning hours of March 28, 2011, Charles and Helene Fontaine experienced something that shattered their beliefs about the nature of reality.

One evening in 1981, Connie J Cannon was on I-75 with her young son, en route to their new home in Florida, when they suddenly found themselves on a military base, with a man in uniform holding a gun to her head as three Grays stood nearby.

In 1979, Diane Fine was on her way from upstate New York to Vermont to see an obstetrics specialist for her high risk pregnancy, and experienced two hours of missing time. When she was finally examined at the clinic, she was told wasn’t pregnant.

In 1970, pilot Bruce Gernon was chased by something through the Bermuda Triangle and he has been talking about it ever since – to UFO Hunters, the Discovery Channel, National Geographic, the History Channel, the Sci-Fi channel, and all their foreign counterparts.

These individuals have never met. But they share something significant. In 2003, a Roper Organization survey revealed that 33 million Americans may be abductees. Aliens in the Backyard is their story.

AUDIO SAMPLE ALIENS IN THE BACKYARD

 

-DNW

 

 

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