Books

Persimmon Pie

A chance encounter with persimmons on Facebook inspired me to post the entire third chapter of AMERICAN PIES – Baking With Dave the Pie Guy – here on my blog. This chapter tells you WHY I wrote the book, how to make a persimmon pie… and more.  If you like what you read, you can buy the entire book  at the Crossroad Press store in time for Christmas or on AMAZON BY CLICKING HERE.

Chapter Three

Fresh Persimmon Pie

You may have guessed by now that this is not just a book of pie recipes.  There are stories behind each of the choices I made for my ‘baker’s dozen’.  (The final pie was the American Pie – we’ll get to that, but you saw it on the cover of the book).  As is the case so often in my life, my past met up with my present one night, and I started remembering, and thinking.

I grew up in southern Illinois.  My grandparents lived in a very small town that had already started to die out by the time I first visited.  The highway moved to the side and bypassed them.  They had lived there for a very long time, having built several homes, and even a log cabin.  My Aunt Lucile (We called her Aunt ‘Toole’ – though I don’t really know why) lived in the house next door, which my grandfather also built.

I spent a lot of time in Flora – that was the town.  Some of the strongest memories and impressions of my life date back to those few small streets, the park outside of town, Johnsonville Lake where my grandpa took us fishing, and the railroad tracks we walked up and down that led out of town.

In those days, there were still a lot of trains.  Sometimes you had to hurry to get off the tracks and out of the way as hundreds of cars rushed past, looking tall as large buildings and making so much noise conversation was impossible.  In later years, my brother and I explored those tracks on our own, but when I was younger I went there with my grandfather, Merle Cornelius Smith, who I remember as the finest man I ever met – and who I wish I’d been older while knowing so I could have heard, and understood, his stories.  I’ve heard a lot of them second hand, and I’ve got pictures, records and the memories my mom has shared.  I just wish I’d been a little more aware of just how amazing his life had been, so I could have soaked more in while I had time to spend.

He took my brother and I back along those railroad tracks because there were nut trees in small groves that he knew where to find – and in one small hollow down off the track, there were persimmon trees.  My grandfather introduced me to a lot of things in life.  He taught me to fish, to tie my own flies, to wrap a fishing rod and build it from scratch, and he taught me about a lot of food that I likely would not have known, or enjoyed.

He showed me how to make dandelion greens into something very much like spinach.  He introduced me to fresh, home-made canned yogurt, gardening, raising earthworms, polishing stones and making jewelry.  Out along the railroad tracks, he introduced me to persimmons.

They were different back then than what you’ll find in the grocery store these days.  They were sort of like a game – you could win a treat, but you couldn’t win if you didn’t play.  About a third of all the persimmons we picked left a bitter aftertaste…finding them just ripe enough was an art form and a shaky one at best.  Still, when they were good, they were among the best flavors in the world, and I never forgot them.

One day we were in our local grocery, here in North Carolina, and there, in a carton, were persimmons.  I got excited.  I probably babbled about them.  I know everyone reached the smile and nod point with me pretty quickly but it didn’t matter.  They were there, and I bought some.  As I ate them, day after day, I waited for that bad one – that bitter taste that had plagued the persimmon bliss of my youth.  It never came.  They were sweet, soft, and consistently good.  Finally, I looked them up on the Internet.

As mankind has done so many times in the past, someone got tired of the ‘problem’ of bitter persimmons.  They not only engineered new ones that were almost never bitter (I did find one bitter one late one night and almost laughed until I cried trying to explain why a bad taste in my mouth brought a good memory).  They also managed to create persimmons without seeds.  I learned, as I read, that they are also called Sharon fruit, named for the Sharon Plain in Israel, where some of the finest of this particular fruit has been grown.  It does look a bit like a star inside when sliced (as you’ll see in the pictures).  They are orange-yellow to dark orange in color and very sweet.

Anyway, after eating these newly rediscovered treats for a couple of weeks, I was sitting in bed thinking (almost always a mistake).  What came to mind was …why have I never seen a persimmon pie?  This led to the question of whether you could make a persimmon pie, and the inevitable Internet journey that led to the answer.

Of course you can.  You can make a pie out of almost anything.  I found several recipes for fresh persimmon pie, and I copied a bunch of them.  Then I did what I usually do.  I poked them, prodded them, talked about them, and generally procrastinated without doing anything.  I, of course, did not regularly bake pies.  I’ve probably baked a couple earlier in my life, but it was so far back I don’t remember.  The question changed from ‘can you make a persimmon pie?’ to ‘Can I make a persimmon pie.”

As it turns out, again, the answer was – of course I can.  Pie is like anything else … you can psyche yourself out and make it into some weird voodoo that only chefs, bakers, and grandmas can pull off with any skill, but the truth is; if you pay attention, take your time, and prepare properly, you can bake a pie.  It’s not rocket science (though I have it on good authority that rocket scientists like pie.).

So…Persimmon Pie.

Once I got over the hurdle of deciding to actually bake the pie, things shifted into a higher gear.  I was all business.  I had my recipe.  I was sure we had everything we needed in the kitchen, I mean, it’s full of baking stuff.  I checked my list, and found that we did, indeed, have most of the ingredients for this particular pie right in our pantry.  Of course, I had to buy persimmons.

The recipe calls for 2 ½ cups of fresh persimmons.  Stumbling block number one.  How many persimmons, exactly, in a cup?  And also – looking at the recipe, I realized I had a bigger problem.  You see, there was a picture of the pie they envisioned.  It was flat across the top, maybe even a little sunken.  It looked a lot like the pies in the supermarket, and that was not what I wanted to bake.

I pulled out the biggest measuring cup we have – it’s an Anchor Hocking Fire-King piece we bought at an auction when we spent our nights buying and selling antiques and collectibles on eBay.  Another lifetime, it seems, after all this time.  Anyway, the top line on the measuring scale said that it held four cups.  It didn’t seem like much to me, and even with that measurement to sort of eyeball, it quickly became obvious that, depending on how they were sliced, the number of persimmons it would take to fill that cup was going to vary wildly.  I bought a whole bag of them.  I err on the side of too much fruit every time, and if there are leftover persimmons, believe me, you won’t be sorry when you taste one.

I gathered the ingredients, but not efficiently.  My method was to put each of the things that I had to have in a different container (why? I have no idea) so I dirtied quite a few cups and bowls in the process.  The recipe called for:

2 ½ Cups of ripe persimmons. (We used 5-6 cups in the end)

1/3 of a Cup of granulated sugar.

1/3 Cup firmly packed brown sugar.

2 ½ Tablespoons of quick cooking tapioca…

What?  Here we break down again.  Cooking tapioca?  I’ve had tapioca pudding often enough.  What was it doing in a pie, though?  I had to stop – mid-pie – and go back to the Internet.  I also had to figure out why, exactly, I’d missed this during my quick inventory.  I mean, the pie was half made, and I was missing something – maybe something important.

Here is one of the lessons I learned about pies.  Fruit is juicy.  (wow, what a revelation).  If you just bake it in a pie, it bubbles out over the edges.  It won’t hold together when you slice it.  It’s more like soup, in fact, than it is like filling.  Cooking tapioca is something bakers use to thicken the filling.  Thankfully for my first pie, it’s not the only thing that will do the job.  The more commonly used ingredient is cornstarch, and according to the cooking experts I found online, you could use about the same amount of cornstarch as you would tapioca and it would work just fine.  That’s what I did.  As luck would have it, we had cornstarch in abundance.  This thickening process is one of the tricky things to learn, and may not work for you perfectly until you experiment with it.  The recipes I found varied wildly on the amount necessary for several of the pies we made.  Our results varied just as wildly, and while we didn’t come out with any bad pies, some were runnier than I’d have liked.  This is where grandmothers have the upper hand with their pinch of this and handful of that.  They just knew…and the reason they knew was they’d done it and done it and done it again.

1 Teaspoon ground cinnamon.

1/2 Teaspoon of grated orange peel.

1/2 Teaspoon of grated lemon peel.

Again…time for another break.  Various recipes call for grated orange and lemon peels, or “zested” peels.  What they don’t tell you is how in the world you’re supposed to get said grated peel, or why it’s there.   I can’t tell you that I know why it’s there – other than flavor – but I can tell you how to get it.

First, wash the lemon, or the orange.  You’d think that goes without saying, but I mention it because it’s something I think about.  I once wrote a story that was published in an anthology about Holidays.  My story?  “For These Things I am Truly Thankful.”  In that story, the protagonist becomes obsessed with the history of things.  The water in his sink, coming through pipes that ran beneath the ground, had been put together by plumbers with God knows what on their hands, had picked up silt and other things from the processing plant, the people there – etc.

I want to point out that the orange and / or lemon in question came from a grocery store, where it was groped by consumers, placed by a stock person, possibly coughed and sneezed on.  Before that they were in a box, shipped from another country, and suffered all of those same things – along with bug spray and BUGS (which is why they spray).  So…since you are using the outside of the fruit, wash it thoroughly.

If you have a potato peeler or a cheese grater, either of these will work fine – and even if the recipe in hand says “zest” – it’s all the same when it hits the pie.  I happen to have a zester by lucky coincidence.  I bought a fancy vegetable carving kit so I could have the tools to carve Halloween pumpkins, and, as it turns out, one of the things they sent (though I had no idea what it was until Trish told me) was a zester.

3 Tablespoons of lemon juice.

I know, I know.  Get on with it, right?  I promise that I will, but I have to tell you, the lemon juice confused me too.  Now I know it’s important, and if it’s missing from a fruit recipe, I usually add it in for good measure.  Lemon juice is a natural preservative.  I’m sure you’ve bitten into an apple, or left one sliced and laying around longer than you should have.  They get brown very quickly.  The same is true of a number of fruits, and if the first thing you do is to slice your fruit, you chance the quick advance of decay while you are busy mixing and whisking and doing pie-baking things.  You sprinkle the aforementioned lemon juice onto the fruit to keep it fresh – and it works.  I can say that after 13 pies, it worked for me every time.  You also get a slight citrus flavor from it, but not distracting.  You actually – oddly – get more flavor from the zested / grated peels.

2 9″ Pastry pie crusts.

I use the boxed crusts you can find at the supermarket.  I do not use the store brand, or any generic.  If I get permission from the company (still waiting) I’ll let you know the brand name before I’m done, but suffice it to say the mascot giggles a lot.  They are (hands down) the best.  I will eventually branch into making my own crusts, I suppose, but my suspicion is that, though I might make one as good as the ones I use, probably I will not make one that is better.

The last ingredient is butter or margarine.  You’ll see anything from one to three tablespoons in pie recipes, but here’s the deal.  This is a pinch of this and handful of that thing, again.  When all the filling is in the pie, you’ll spot the top of it with small dabs of butter or margarine.  It melts down in and blends with the juice, cornstarch, and filling and it’s important so make sure you remember – right before that second crust goes over the top of the pie (I’ll mention this again when I reach that point, but I want to be sure you don’t forget.  I did – once – and had to peel back the top crust and slide it in.  A delicate job that could have ruined a perfectly good pie.)

Preparation:

Now it’s time to make this pie.  Rinse the persimmons (see my note about washing fruit above).  These have a weird leaf/stem that has to be cut out.  It’s easiest to cut in a circle around it and pop it off the top.  The recipes all called for the persimmons to then be cut into thin slices.  Here is where I’ll make another comment.  We did as they instructed, and the pie was actually very good.  Persimmons, though, unless incredibly ripe, are kind of crunchy.  If you slice the persimmons into, basically, circular slices, you’ll find them a little hard to cut with a fork when eating them, though they look really good in the bowl, and in the pie.  I didn’t mind this – but I love persimmons.  For better results, I think, I’d suggest almost dicing the fruit.  Some recipes call for pulping the persimmons (boiling them to mush) but I don’t like doing this to any fruit – dicing will give you smaller, more manageable chunks.

Once your persimmons are cut, or sliced, and ready –put them in a medium to large sized bowl and sprinkle the lemon juice over them.  Set this aside and find yourself another medium sized bowl.  In this bowl, combine the two types of sugar, tapioca (or cornstarch), cinnamon, orange and lemon peels and stir them thoroughly.  You need to mix up all the powders until you have them spread evenly so you don’t end up with pockets of cornstarch, or sugar on one side, and all the orange peels on the other.  I use either a whisk, or a large spoon for this mixing.  The spoon is good because you can use it to sprinkle the resultant mixture over the fruit.

Now, set aside your second bowl and get your pie plate ready.  I recommend as deep a 9″ pie plate as you can find.  I only use glass or Pyrex plates.  Set the plate on a surface where you have some working room, and then get out your pie crusts.  Unroll the first crust and place it over the top of the pie plate, then carefully press it down into the plate so that it shapes to the glass.  The crust will extend out past the edge of the plate.  At this point, take a knife and cut around the edge of the plate, trimming off the excess crust.

You can do what you want with this excess.  They say it’s bad to eat it raw, though I’ve done that.  The “Pie Bloke” over in the UK tells me it’s because there is raw egg in it.  Trish suggests rolling it into balls, sprinkling it with cinnamon and sugar, and baking it to make pie-crust cookies.  We did that once, and they were okay, but nothing to write home about.  The important thing is that you trim even with the flat top edge of your pie-plate.

When this is done you have a couple of choices.  As you will see in the photos of my own persimmon pie, I chose to mix all of the ingredients in with the persimmons thoroughly, and then place them in the pie.  The other method is layering, sprinkling in some of the ingredients, then layering persimmons on top of that, sprinkling more, etc.  If you choose this latter method, don’t skimp.  You need all the ingredients in the pie if you can manage it.  The key is that the fruit should be coated in the sugar and cornstarch and cinnamon, and that it should filter down and fill the cracks between the fruit.  As the pie bakes, the fruit will sort of melt into the rest of it, and combine.  It’s a beautiful thing.

From here on out, it’s pretty easy.  Don’t forget to dab in the bits of butter or margarine.  Spread them out across the pie filling, but it doesn’t REALLY matter where you put them.  Next you need to take that second pie crust, unroll it, and very carefully place it over the top of the pie.  You have to get it centered so that there is excess sticking out over the edges of the plate.

There are tools for what I’m about to describe.  I don’t own one.  I have an old can opener with the pointed, triangular end on it.  Not much good for cans these days, but you can use it here.  Hold it with the top down.  Press it firmly into the top crust directly above the flat glass edge of the pie plate.  This presses the two crusts together and leaves a cool indentation.  Right beside this, do it again, and continue this carefully all the way around the perimeter of the pie, until you’ve come full circle and the edges of the impressions touch.  The cool technical term for this is crimping  When this is done, once again, trim off all the excess crust and set it aside for whatever you’ve decided to use it for.

At this point, I usually stop and turn on the oven.  It takes a while to preheat.  This also brings me to another wide variance in the recipes of others.  Baking time, and temperature.  This recipe calls for setting the oven at 375° – and I have to say, on this first pie I probably got lucky.  I’m convinced that the perfect baking time on most pies hovers on or around one hour.  The best results I’ve had have involved starting with a really high temperature, and dropping it down after twenty minutes or so…but for this pie, set the oven to 375° and wait for it to preheat.

Next you need to cut vents in your top crust.  This is another thing that you don’t want to forget, because, as I keep saying, step after step, it’s important.  The vents let the pressure and heat from the fruit cooking inside release any built up pressure and gives the filling a place to bubble up and out if it gets too hot.  I cut slits from near the center down in a star pattern.  Some people cut sort of tear-drop shaped slits, and others try to get artistic and cut designs.  The star was quick and easy, and it’s what I went with.  Later in the book I’ll show you what happened when we tried to get more creative.  In the end – I’m going to eat the pie…so I don’t need anything fancy.

At this point I slapped my pie in on the bottom shelf, as the recipe called for, and set my timer for one hour.  It was a mistake, and I’ll explain that in a moment.  While it’s baking you should look in on it now and then.  Make sure the edges get a little brown before you pull it out, and make sure they don’t get too brown.  Again, it’s something you learn to get just right over time.

But let’s get back to that mistake.  Remember I said you had the vents in case the filling needs to bubble up and out?  It does.  It always does, at least a little.  If you put your pie in on the oven rack, that fruit filling is going to sizzle and drip all over the bottom of your oven.  This is not going to make people happy.  It’s hard to get out, it bakes onto the inner surface of the oven like cement, and it’s easily avoidable.  What you need to do is either to put a foil covered cookie or pizza pan underneath your pie pan, or to make something.  That’s what I do, now.  After Trish quit cursing at me, and showed me how, I started using a drip pan created by taking a couple of sheets of tinfoil and folding them.  You fold one in half, just a bit wider than the pie pan.  Then you take the other, fold it over and around the first forming a sort of cross.  Crimp up the edges so that anything trying to run over the edge of your pie – won’t.  Again…this is important.

Now, place your pie into the heated oven, set yourself a timer (I use the one on the microwave above the stove) and sit back to wait out the hour for your finished pie.  When it’s baked, remove it carefully and place it on the stop top to cool.  I think about an hour is perfect for cooling.  Your finished product should look something like this:

If you did it right…shortly after this, it will look more like this:

And there you have it.  I will include the full recipes for each of these pies at the back of the book (minus the commentary).  They will also be available (for those who buy the book) as a printable recipe cards.  These chapters are longer, but I hope not boring – and I know likely to improve your outcome.  Learn from my mistakes…that’s why I’m here.  Now, on to our next adventure, Fresh Pear Pie.

A Midnight Dreary – Book V of the DeChance Chronicles Underway

Work is well underway as A Midnight Dreary passes the 30,000 word mark. I’m sort of doing Nanowrimo this year, in that the book will pass 50k before the end of the month, but it will be much longer than that. At 30k I have only just reached the beginning of the three separate threads that will bring all the main characters, Donovan and Edgar Allan Poe from my novel Nevermore, Bullfinch, and a new O.C.L.T. member heading to New Orleans to meet with Copper and Alicia from my novel Darkness falling, and Amethyst, Cletus J. Diggs, and old Nettie headed into the Great Dismal Swamp.

This novel, probably the most complex and ambitious of my career, will draw firmly together the adventures of the O.C.L.T. – Donovan DeChance and his world, Cletus J. Diggs and Old Mill, North Carolina, and the open strands left (read that as surviving characters) from Darkness Falling… At least two versions of Poe stories from a very different perspective, one well known and one obscure – multiple continents… world building.

One thing readers have asked for is a fleshing out of the character Amethyst, Donovan’s love interest, and this novel will not disappoint. There will also be revelations in the odd and discordant career of the Not Quite Right Reverend Cletus J. Diggs…

The cover art was purchased from a Russian artist, Konstantin Korobov… the cover design is by David Dodd…

More updates to follow.  There is an excerpt from this book titled MASQUERADE available along with several of my other works, including the entire novel “Heart of a Dragon,” first in this series.

Halloween Post #2 Ten Horror Novels I love

I am not going to say these are my ten favorite horror novels, they probably are not. These are ten horror novels I’ve read and have not been able to forget – ten books I think you will enjoy, and that I consider to be classics… you will find that I have cheated and there are actually twelve books… but I’m pretty sure you’ll forgive me…

In no particular order:

Skin – by Kathe Koja – I bought this at my first big horror convention, and I read it – in one sitting – on the train on the way home. Kathe has a way of drawing you into the world of very tortured characters, making you not only understand, but feel their pain… this is a very literary, very intense novel.

Fever Dream – by George R. R. Martin – One of my favorite vampire novels.  A different setting, a different take on an ancient curse… not to be missed.

(Trilogy) Koko / Mystery / The Throat – by Peter Straub – here is where I cheat. If you read just Koko, you will not be disappointed… but to truly appreciate what Peter did here, you need to read all three.  Imagine sitting through an entire year of history, or math – you finally grasp everything for the final exam, and pass… then come back the next year an learn the same subject – but find that everything you thought you knew was wrong…   And then, in the third year? It happens again.

Boy’s Life – by Robert McCammon – Hands down my favorite coming-of-age horror novel. With a dinosaur.

Lightning – by Dean Koontz – I have read and enjoyed dozens of Dean’s novels, but this one sticks out for me.  The detail was exquisite, and it may well be the most well-crafted time-travel novel of all time.

Something Wicked This Way Comes – by Ray Bradbury – This should come as no surprise to anyone… Bradbury was a master, and this is my favorite of his novels.

The Old Gods Waken – by Manly Wade Wellman – The first “Silver John” novel – I would have chosen The Lost & Lurking, but thought it best to choose the FIRST of these wonderful novels of the North Carolina mountains and their magic.

The Haunting of Hill House – by Shirley Jackson – The template against which haunted house novels have been modeled and judged all of my life. A wonderful story.

The Song of Kali – by Dan Simmons – This novel is very well researched and one of the darkest, most twisted tales I’ve ever encountered.  Very few books give me shivers, but this one managed it.

Christine – by Stephen King – I am a huge fan of Steve’s work. I’ve read very nearly everything he’s ever written, and have loved most of it – all for different reasons.  For some reason, this haunted car stuck with me, and I believe it might be the same reason The Mangler made my list of memorable stories.  It should be ridiculous, given only the plot to work with – a car that rolls backward and gets younger… a creepy old ghost… but it is not.  It is very real, and has some absolutely CREEPY moments… if it’s a King you have ignored – you should not.

A Storyteller’s Birthday Wish

I am a storyteller. For years now I’ve spent more time helping bring other people’s stories out than I have writing my own… and I’m okay with that, because I AM still writing… but tomorrow is my birthday. Instead of just stopping by and saying Happy happy… let’s interact. Below is a link to my Amazon page with almost literally everything I’ve written available… in the first comment will be a list of my books available through Kindle Unlimited for those people who subscribe, so you can find my books that are available for you to read for free. Most of my audiobooks are whispersync ready and can be had for a pittance beyond the eBook price. MANY of them are available in print, some for the first time just this year in trade paperback. What I want for my birthday is simple. Read something of mine. Tell me what you read, what of mine you have liked (or loved) (or even hated). If you have a favorite thing of mine, leave a review on Amazon, or Goodreads… sign up for the free signed copy giveaway on Goodreads for my novel Gideon’s Curse… buy “Remember Bowling Green” so I can donate the money to the ACLU… the thing that would make me feel the best on my birthday would be to entertain some people, and to feel as if I write – and I talk about that – and it’s of more than slight, passing interest to a few of the thousands of folks who follow me between this profile and my author page… Going to put this on my author page as well, and on my blog so it goes to Goodreads, and on Wattpad, where literally tens of thousands of people read my novel Heart of a Dragon for free, and loved it (from the comments) but could not ring themselves to pay the $2.99 or $3.99 to read the rest of the series… writing is a lonely profession… help a fella out.

AMAZON’S DAVID NIALL WILSON PAGE

DAVID NIALL WILSON ON KINDLE UNLIMITED

Great Gifts for the Holiday? American Pies – HC or TPB – An Excerpt!

pieguycoverwebsiteI wrote a book a couple of years back titled American Pies – Baking With Dave the Pie Guy… it’s got a bunch of pie recipes, all tried, photographed, and described in detail – and a bit more… it all started with the question of whether or not you could make a pie from persimmons, something I loved as a child, and discovered because of my grandfather.  The answer is yes… here’s the Fresh Persimmon Pie recipe from my book… which you should buy people for Christmas… just saying. Here’s the Amazon Link:

AMERICAN PIES: Baking with Dave the Pie Guy

Chapter Three

Fresh Persimmon Pie

You may have guessed by now that this is not just a book of pie recipes.  There are stories behind each of the choices I made for my ‘baker’s dozen’.  (The final pie was the American Pie – we’ll get to that, but you saw it on the cover of the book).  As is the case so often in my life, my past met up with my present one night, and I started remembering, and thinking.

I grew up in southern Illinois.  My grandparents lived in a very small town that had already started to die out by the time I first visited.  The highway moved to the side and bypassed them.  They had lived there for a very long time, having built several homes, and even a log cabin.  My Aunt Lucile (We called her Aunt ‘Toole’ – though I don’t really know why) lived in the house next door, which my grandfather also built.

I spent a lot of time in Flora – that was the town.  Some of the strongest memories and impressions of my life date back to those few small streets, the park outside of town, Johnsonville Lake where my grandpa took us fishing, and the railroad tracks we walked up and down that led out of town.

In those days, there were still a lot of trains.  Sometimes you had to hurry to get off the tracks and out of the way as hundreds of cars rushed past, looking tall as large buildings and making so much noise conversation was impossible.  In later years, my brother and I explored those tracks on our own, but when I was younger I went there with my grandfather, Merle Cornelius Smith, who I remember as the finest man I ever met – and who I wish I’d been older while knowing so I could have heard, and understood, his stories.  I’ve heard a lot of them second hand, and I’ve got pictures, records and the memories my mom has shared.  I just wish I’d been a little more aware of just how amazing his life had been, so I could have soaked more in while I had time to spend.

He took my brother and I back along those railroad tracks because there were nut trees in small groves that he knew where to find – and in one small hollow down off the track, there were persimmon trees.  My grandfather introduced me to a lot of things in life.  He taught me to fish, to tie my own flies, to wrap a fishing rod and build it from scratch, and he taught me about a lot of food that I likely would not have known, or enjoyed.

He showed me how to make dandelion greens into something very much like spinach.  He introduced me to fresh, home-made canned yogurt, gardening, raising earthworms, polishing stones and making jewelry.  Out along the railroad tracks, he introduced me to persimmons.

They were different back then than what you’ll find in the grocery store these days.  They were sort of like a game – you could win a treat, but you couldn’t win if you didn’t play.  About a third of all the persimmons we picked left a bitter aftertaste…finding them just ripe enough was an art form and a shaky one at best.  Still, when they were good, they were among the best flavors in the world, and I never forgot them.

One day we were in our local grocery, here in North Carolina, and there, in a carton, were persimmons.  I got excited.  I probably babbled about them.  I know everyone reached the smile and nod point with me pretty quickly but it didn’t matter.  They were there, and I bought some.  As I ate them, day after day, I waited for that bad one – that bitter taste that had plagued the persimmon bliss of my youth.  It never came.  They were sweet, soft, and consistently good.  Finally, I looked them up on the Internet.

As mankind has done so many times in the past, someone got tired of the ‘problem’ of bitter persimmons.  They not only engineered new ones that were almost never bitter (I did find one bitter one late one night and almost laughed until I cried trying to explain why a bad taste in my mouth brought a good memory).  They also managed to create persimmons without seeds.  I learned, as I read, that they are also called Sharon fruit, named for the Sharon Plain in Israel, where some of the finest of this particular fruit has been grown.  It does look a bit like a star inside when sliced (as you’ll see in the pictures).  They are orange-yellow to dark orange in color and very sweet.

Anyway, after eating these newly rediscovered treats for a couple of weeks, I was sitting in bed thinking (almost always a mistake).  What came to mind was …why have I never seen a persimmon pie?  This led to the question of whether you could make a persimmon pie, and the inevitable Internet journey that led to the answer.

Of course you can.  You can make a pie out of almost anything.  I found several recipes for fresh persimmon pie, and I copied a bunch of them.  Then I did what I usually do.  I poked them, prodded them, talked about them, and generally procrastinated without doing anything.  I, of course, did not regularly bake pies.  I’ve probably baked a couple earlier in my life, but it was so far back I don’t remember.  The question changed from ‘can you make a persimmon pie?’ to ‘Can I make a persimmon pie.”

As it turns out, again, the answer was – of course I can.  Pie is like anything else … you can psyche yourself out and make it into some weird voodoo that only chefs, bakers, and grandmas can pull off with any skill, but the truth is; if you pay attention, take your time, and prepare properly, you can bake a pie.  It’s not rocket science (though I have it on good authority that rocket scientists like pie.).

So…Persimmon Pie.

persimmon

Once I got over the hurdle of deciding to actually bake the pie, things shifted into a higher gear.  I was all business.  I had my recipe.  I was sure we had everything we needed in the kitchen, I mean, it’s full of baking stuff.  I checked my list, and found that we did, indeed, have most of the ingredients for this particular pie right in our pantry.  Of course, I had to buy persimmons.

The recipe calls for 2 ½ cups of fresh persimmons.  Stumbling block number one.  How many persimmons, exactly, in a cup?  And also – looking at the recipe, I realized I had a bigger problem.  You see, there was a picture of the pie they envisioned.  It was flat across the top, maybe even a little sunken.  It looked a lot like the pies in the supermarket, and that was not what I wanted to bake.

I pulled out the biggest measuring cup we have – it’s an Anchor Hocking Fire-King piece we bought at an auction when we spent our nights buying and selling antiques and collectibles on eBay.  Another lifetime, it seems, after all this time.  Anyway, the top line on the measuring scale said that it held four cups.  It didn’t seem like much to me, and even with that measurement to sort of eyeball, it quickly became obvious that, depending on how they were sliced, the number of persimmons it would take to fill that cup was going to vary wildly.  I bought a whole bag of them.  I err on the side of too much fruit every time, and if there are leftover persimmons, believe me, you won’t be sorry when you taste one.

I gathered the ingredients, but not efficiently.  My method was to put each of the things that I had to have in a different container (why? I have no idea) so I dirtied quite a few cups and bowls in the process.  The recipe called for:

2 ½ Cups of ripe persimmons. (We used 5-6 cups in the end)

1/3 of a Cup of granulated sugar.

1/3 Cup firmly packed brown sugar.

2 ½ Tablespoons of quick cooking tapioca…

What?  Here we break down again.  Cooking tapioca?  I’ve had tapioca pudding often enough.  What was it doing in a pie, though?  I had to stop – mid-pie – and go back to the Internet.  I also had to figure out why, exactly, I’d missed this during my quick inventory.  I mean, the pie was half made, and I was missing something – maybe something important.

Here is one of the lessons I learned about pies.  Fruit is juicy.  (wow, what a revelation).  If you just bake it in a pie, it bubbles out over the edges.  It won’t hold together when you slice it.  It’s more like soup, in fact, than it is like filling.  Cooking tapioca is something bakers use to thicken the filling.  Thankfully for my first pie, it’s not the only thing that will do the job.  The more commonly used ingredient is cornstarch, and according to the cooking experts I found online, you could use about the same amount of cornstarch as you would tapioca and it would work just fine.  That’s what I did.  As luck would have it, we had cornstarch in abundance.  This thickening process is one of the tricky things to learn, and may not work for you perfectly until you experiment with it.  The recipes I found varied wildly on the amount necessary for several of the pies we made.  Our results varied just as wildly, and while we didn’t come out with any bad pies, some were runnier than I’d have liked.  This is where grandmothers have the upper hand with their pinch of this and handful of that.  They just knew…and the reason they knew was they’d done it and done it and done it again.

1 Teaspoon ground cinnamon.

1/2 Teaspoon of grated orange peel.

1/2 Teaspoon of grated lemon peel.

Again…time for another break.  Various recipes call for grated orange and lemon peels, or “zested” peels.  What they don’t tell you is how in the world you’re supposed to get said grated peel, or why it’s there.   I can’t tell you that I know why it’s there – other than flavor – but I can tell you how to get it.

First, wash the lemon, or the orange.  You’d think that goes without saying, but I mention it because it’s something I think about.  I once wrote a story that was published in an anthology about Holidays.  My story?  “For These Things I am Truly Thankful.”  In that story, the protagonist becomes obsessed with the history of things.  The water in his sink, coming through pipes that ran beneath the ground, had been put together by plumbers with God knows what on their hands, had picked up silt and other things from the processing plant, the people there – etc.

I want to point out that the orange and / or lemon in question came from a grocery store, where it was groped by consumers, placed by a stock person, possibly coughed and sneezed on.  Before that they were in a box, shipped from another country, and suffered all of those same things – along with bug spray and BUGS (which is why they spray).  So…since you are using the outside of the fruit, wash it thoroughly.

If you have a potato peeler or a cheese grater, either of these will work fine – and even if the recipe in hand says “zest” – it’s all the same when it hits the pie.  I happen to have a zester by lucky coincidence.  I bought a fancy vegetable carving kit so I could have the tools to carve Halloween pumpkins, and, as it turns out, one of the things they sent (though I had no idea what it was until Trish told me) was a zester.

3 Tablespoons of lemon juice.

I know, I know.  Get on with it, right?  I promise that I will, but I have to tell you, the lemon juice confused me too.  Now I know it’s important, and if it’s missing from a fruit recipe, I usually add it in for good measure.  Lemon juice is a natural preservative.  I’m sure you’ve bitten into an apple, or left one sliced and laying around longer than you should have.  They get brown very quickly.  The same is true of a number of fruits, and if the first thing you do is to slice your fruit, you chance the quick advance of decay while you are busy mixing and whisking and doing pie-baking things.  You sprinkle the aforementioned lemon juice onto the fruit to keep it fresh – and it works.  I can say that after 13 pies, it worked for me every time.  You also get a slight citrus flavor from it, but not distracting.  You actually – oddly – get more flavor from the zested / grated peels.

2 9″ Pastry pie crusts.

I use the boxed crusts you can find at the supermarket.  I do not use the store brand, or any generic.  If I get permission from the company (still waiting) I’ll let you know the brand name before I’m done, but suffice it to say the mascot giggles a lot.  They are (hands down) the best.  I will eventually branch into making my own crusts, I suppose, but my suspicion is that, though I might make one as good as the ones I use, probably I will not make one that is better.

The last ingredient is butter or margarine.  You’ll see anything from one to three tablespoons in pie recipes, but here’s the deal.  This is a pinch of this and handful of that thing, again.  When all the filling is in the pie, you’ll spot the top of it with small dabs of butter or margarine.  It melts down in and blends with the juice, cornstarch, and filling and it’s important so make sure you remember – right before that second crust goes over the top of the pie (I’ll mention this again when I reach that point, but I want to be sure you don’t forget.  I did – once – and had to peel back the top crust and slide it in.  A delicate job that could have ruined a perfectly good pie.)

Preparation:

Now it’s time to make this pie.  Rinse the persimmons (see my note about washing fruit above).  These have a weird leaf/stem that has to be cut out.  It’s easiest to cut in a circle around it and pop it off the top.  The recipes all called for the persimmons to then be cut into thin slices.  Here is where I’ll make another comment.  We did as they instructed, and the pie was actually very good.  Persimmons, though, unless incredibly ripe, are kind of crunchy.  If you slice the persimmons into, basically, circular slices, you’ll find them a little hard to cut with a fork when eating them, though they look really good in the bowl, and in the pie.  I didn’t mind this – but I love persimmons.  For better results, I think, I’d suggest almost dicing the fruit.  Some recipes call for pulping the persimmons (boiling them to mush) but I don’t like doing this to any fruit – dicing will give you smaller, more manageable chunks.

persimmon2

Once your persimmons are cut, or sliced, and ready –put them in a medium to large sized bowl and sprinkle the lemon juice over them.  Set this aside and find yourself another medium sized bowl.  In this bowl, combine the two types of sugar, tapioca (or cornstarch), cinnamon, orange and lemon peels and stir them thoroughly.  You need to mix up all the powders until you have them spread evenly so you don’t end up with pockets of cornstarch, or sugar on one side, and all the orange peels on the other.  I use either a whisk, or a large spoon for this mixing.  The spoon is good because you can use it to sprinkle the resultant mixture over the fruit.

persimmon3

Now, set aside your second bowl and get your pie plate ready.  I recommend as deep a 9″ pie plate as you can find.  I only use glass or Pyrex plates.  Set the plate on a surface where you have some working room, and then get out your pie crusts.  Unroll the first crust and place it over the top of the pie plate, then carefully press it down into the plate so that it shapes to the glass.  The crust will extend out past the edge of the plate.  At this point, take a knife and cut around the edge of the plate, trimming off the excess crust.

You can do what you want with this excess.  They say it’s bad to eat it raw, though I’ve done that.  The “Pie Bloke” over in the UK tells me it’s because there is raw egg in it.  Trish suggests rolling it into balls, sprinkling it with cinnamon and sugar, and baking it to make pie-crust cookies.  We did that once, and they were okay, but nothing to write home about.  The important thing is that you trim even with the flat top edge of your pie-plate.

When this is done you have a couple of choices.  As you will see in the photos of my own persimmon pie, I chose to mix all of the ingredients in with the persimmons thoroughly, and then place them in the pie.  The other method is layering, sprinkling in some of the ingredients, then layering persimmons on top of that, sprinkling more, etc.  If you choose this latter method, don’t skimp.  You need all the ingredients in the pie if you can manage it.  The key is that the fruit should be coated in the sugar and cornstarch and cinnamon, and that it should filter down and fill the cracks between the fruit.  As the pie bakes, the fruit will sort of melt into the rest of it, and combine.  It’s a beautiful thing.

persimmon4

From here on out, it’s pretty easy.  Don’t forget to dab in the bits of butter or margarine.  Spread them out across the pie filling, but it doesn’t REALLY matter where you put them.  Next you need to take that second pie crust, unroll it, and very carefully place it over the top of the pie.  You have to get it centered so that there is excess sticking out over the edges of the plate.

There are tools for what I’m about to describe.  I don’t own one.  I have an old can opener with the pointed, triangular end on it.  Not much good for cans these days, but you can use it here.  Hold it with the top down.  Press it firmly into the top crust directly above the flat glass edge of the pie plate.  This presses the two crusts together and leaves a cool indentation.  Right beside this, do it again, and continue this carefully all the way around the perimeter of the pie, until you’ve come full circle and the edges of the impressions touch.  The cool technical term for this is crimping  When this is done, once again, trim off all the excess crust and set it aside for whatever you’ve decided to use it for.

At this point, I usually stop and turn on the oven.  It takes a while to preheat.  This also brings me to another wide variance in the recipes of others.  Baking time, and temperature.  This recipe calls for setting the oven at 375° – and I have to say, on this first pie I probably got lucky.  I’m convinced that the perfect baking time on most pies hovers on or around one hour.  The best results I’ve had have involved starting with a really high temperature, and dropping it down after twenty minutes or so…but for this pie, set the oven to 375° and wait for it to preheat.

Next you need to cut vents in your top crust.  This is another thing that you don’t want to forget, because, as I keep saying, step after step, it’s important.  The vents let the pressure and heat from the fruit cooking inside release any built up pressure and gives the filling a place to bubble up and out if it gets too hot.  I cut slits from near the center down in a star pattern.  Some people cut sort of tear-drop shaped slits, and others try to get artistic and cut designs.  The star was quick and easy, and it’s what I went with.  Later in the book I’ll show you what happened when we tried to get more creative.  In the end – I’m going to eat the pie…so I don’t need anything fancy.

persimmon5

At this point I slapped my pie in on the bottom shelf, as the recipe called for, and set my timer for one hour.  It was a mistake, and I’ll explain that in a moment.  While it’s baking you should look in on it now and then.  Make sure the edges get a little brown before you pull it out, and make sure they don’t get too brown.  Again, it’s something you learn to get just right over time.

But let’s get back to that mistake.  Remember I said you had the vents in case the filling needs to bubble up and out?  It does.  It always does, at least a little.  If you put your pie in on the oven rack, that fruit filling is going to sizzle and drip all over the bottom of your oven.  This is not going to make people happy.  It’s hard to get out, it bakes onto the inner surface of the oven like cement, and it’s easily avoidable.  What you need to do is either to put a foil covered cookie or pizza pan underneath your pie pan, or to make something.  That’s what I do, now.  After Trish quit cursing at me, and showed me how, I started using a drip pan created by taking a couple of sheets of tinfoil and folding them.  You fold one in half, just a bit wider than the pie pan.  Then you take the other, fold it over and around the first forming a sort of cross.  Crimp up the edges so that anything trying to run over the edge of your pie – won’t.  Again…this is important.

Now, place your pie into the heated oven, set yourself a timer (I use the one on the microwave above the stove) and sit back to wait out the hour for your finished pie.  When it’s baked, remove it carefully and place it on the stop top to cool.  I think about an hour is perfect for cooling.  Your finished product should look something like this:

persimmon6

If you did it right…shortly after this, it will look more like this:

persimmon7

And there you have it.  I will include the full recipes for each of these pies at the back of the book (minus the commentary).  They will also be available (for those who buy the book) as a printable recipe cards.  These chapters are longer, but I hope not boring – and I know likely to improve your outcome.  Learn from my mistakes…that’s why I’m here.  Now, on to our next adventure, Fresh Pear Pie.

 

Rich Chizmar, Cemetery Dance … a Flashback Post

_cd001large1I am in the middle of a HUGE reorganization of all my writing files, backups, folders, books, stories… and more. I’ve rediscovered things I’ve lost, found things I don’t even remember writing… and it’s set in motion a great fixing and cleansing of things… One thing I have found is that I have written a LOT of articles, reviews, blog posts, etc… and some of it bears revisiting.  Some of the comments in this post are dated – because it’s 2016, and the article was written in 2004…

It defines a moment in my career, and those who know my work know how I feel about Defining Moments…

Without Further Ado:

Some time in 1988, I’m not sure what month; I was sitting around with my good buddy John B. Rosenman.  He and I were in a writing frenzy that year, and in years to come.  We submitted to any market that surfaced on the horizon, and, having been at it longer than I had been at the time, John was very successful at landing slots in them.  I was telling him about a story I’d sold to After Hours Magazine, and he told me about the premiere issue of Cemetery Dance.  He showed me the magazine; its cover was a sort of grotesque, striking black and white illustration.  I knew a lot of the folks being published in that first issue – others I did not know.  I didn’t know Rich Chizmar, for one, and made a mental note that I should do so.

What followed was a period in my career where two men saw (literally) hundreds of thousands of words of my earlier fiction and turned it all down.  Between Stephen Mark Rainey at Deathrealm, and Rich Chizmar, I probably produced two novels worth of short stories that were not quite right for their publications.  Still, I continued, because they were encouraging.  Rich, in particular, was an inspiration to me.  I was publishing a magazine called The Tome, and though I was having successes of my own, I watched Rich go quickly from a solid start to the successor to Dave Silva’s Horror Show in literally only a few issues.  Everyone was talking about Cemetery Dance, and this spurred me on both to improve my own magazine, and to write something that would catch Rich’s attention.

Oddly, when I finally did so, it was a story he’d already passed on.  Somehow my tale, “The Mole,” stuck with him, and one day I got a phone call.  “Do you still have that tunnel rat story?” he asked.  That moment changed my career forever – I believe that.  It was a sale I had coveted since the late eighties, and when it finally happened (that was the Fall, 1990 issue) it felt like one of those career-changing epiphanies.  When that same story was reprinted in “The Best of Cemetery Dance,” I was in heaven.  That was another first that Rich gave me – my first appearance in a book signed by myself and by Stephen King (thankfully not my last).  I went on to sell a number of stories to Rich over the years and a novella, and he has always been encouraging to me – very positive and upbeat despite the curve balls life has thrown us both.

I have to say that when I first sat and leafed through issue number one of Cemetery Dance, I should have been more perceptive.  He hit the horror business like a comet and we never saw him coming.  After fifteen years and more than fifty publications, (Remember, this was written back in 2004) and with a future as bright as he wants it to be, Rich is the guy we should all be looking to when we need inspiration – and has always been there for me when I needed his support.  Congratulations on 15 years of amazing accomplishments Rich.  We still need to get together for golf.

The Writing of the Novel Deep Blue

Adobe Photoshop PDFI’ve posted this before, but my novel DEEP BLUE will be on sale at all outlets for .99 from now until at least the 5th of October.  This is the book (don’t take my word for it, read the reviews) that was compared to King and Koontz… the big book that should have been my breakout (and still could be with your help) that came out from a small publisher… didn’t do well despite wonderful trade reviews… and still needs a wider audience.

The novel Deep Blue finds its origin in the novelette by the same name published in an anthology titled Strange Attraction.  In Strange Attraction, all the stories were inspired by the “Kinetic” Art of Lisa Snelling, each author choosing one of the characters on an intricately detailed Ferris wheel sculpture.  I was honored to be among authors such as Neil Gaiman and Gene Wolfe in presenting our separate visions of what lay buried behind her art.  From the images presented, I chose a harlequin, hanging by a noose from the bottom of one of the Ferris wheels seats.  I took the image, made it the wallpaper on my computer, printed it out and carried it around with me, and let it sink in.  I could have written any number of stories that would have sufficed, but somehow I knew there would be more to this work, and so I waited.

The publishers of the anthology, Vince and Leslie Harper, invited me to have dinner with them one night when my mundane job took me to Washington DC.  We met for Mexican food and went together to see the movie PI which, at the time, was newly released.  On the way to meet the Harpers, I walked down into a shadowed subway, and I was assaulted by some of the most haunting saxophone music I’ve ever heard.  It bordered the blues, walked down old jazz roads, and I never saw the musician.  That set the mood for what was to come.

I reached the restaurant without further incident, and we spent a pleasant hour scalding mouths and stomachs with jalapenos and washing them down with beer.  Then came the movie.  I won’t go into detail about PI, but I’ll say it’s a black and white film, very surreal, filled with symbolism, and it left me visually and emotionally stunned.  I parted company with Vince and his wife, found my way back to the subway and my hotel, and called it a night.

The next day, a friend of mine and I set out to visit The Holocaust Museum.  I have always wanted to see it, but I was not prepared for the intensity of the images, the displays, and the words I would find in that short hour visit.  I purchased a book of poetry written by the victims, and left with so much bottled up inside from those two days that I thought it would be the end of my sanity.

That night, I started to write.  I started to write about The Blues, and how deep they might really get.  I wrote about pain, not my pain, but the pain bottled up inside the world, as the pain had been bottled up inside me, and I wrote a way out.  That was Brandt, his guitar, and his blues.  The story, like the pain, refused to be bottled up in just the few lines of that novelette, and so I released it into the novel you now hold.

Everyone comes to their crossroads eventually – the defining moment of life.  As Old Wally, one of the novel’s main characters tells us – “Crossroads, or the crosshairs.”  Forward or back, but you can’t stay stagnant – that way lies madness.  I give you . . . Deep Blue.

Why I Love Historical Fantasy – and ONLY TODAY LEFT FOR STORYBUNDLE

All Covers Large

I wanted to tell you all about something you might not be aware of… well, two things, actually. You might not have been aware of this Historical Fantasy Storybundle and all the wonderful authors and books associated with it, and you might even be unaware of my novel, The Orffyreus Wheel, which is a dual-timeline novel covering an inventor named Johann Bessler, who may, or may not, have invented a perpetual motion machine a very long time ago – and the implications of such (basically) free energy source in modern times – the energy barons who would kill to shut it down – the visionaries who would fight to set it free. Those are not the point, though.  The point is… Historical Fantasy.

I have always loved history. When I was a kid I took every course I could on the subject. I’ve read extensively. Early on, I discovered another way to learn – and I learned it from a novel titled Northwest Passage, by Kenneth Roberts (whose books I ended up devouring).  Historical fantasy, while bringing you magic, made up heroics and legends, ALSO (see the genre title) brings you history.  A well-written, well-researched historical novel that draws you in leaves you with the satisfaction of a story that sticks with you, but also with knowledge gained through the reading of it… Margaret Atwood and (from this bundle) Jo Graham, can give you ancient Egypt with details you might never have known. Kenneth Roberts gave me the truth about Benedict Arnold, and so much more. I can’t begin to list the number of times a book, or a story, has gifted me with insights into history that I would have missed in a dry, classroom environment.  The series “The Order of the Air,” by this bundle’s head honcho Melissa Scott, and Jo Graham, covers a period just prior to Hitler’s Reich, bringing you insights into air travel, technology, Nikola Tesla, and so much more.

I urge you to hop on over to STORYBUNDLE.COM  and drop a small amount (It’s a pay what you want bundle that also supports charity) and take this (only today is left) last chance to pick up a number of wonderful Historical Fantasy novels, stories of all sorts with that one common thread of research, revelation, and intrigue. You won’t be disappointed.  And if you should find my book, or any of the others to your liking, (or hating, even), the authors would appreciate greatly if you left reviews on the various sites like Amazon, B&N, Apple, and Goodreads.

Go on… you KNOW you need some books.

The DeChance Chronicles Omnibus – Books 1-4 only .99!

DeChance Omnibus coverwebFOR A LIMITED TIME – all four books for only .99 – time to fall in love with a new series!

AMAZON   BARNES & NOBLE  APPLE  KOBO  GOOGLE

Donovan DeChance is a collector of ancient manuscripts and books, a practicing mage, and a private investigator. This Omnibus Collection includes books I, II, III, and IV of the series. Included are Heart of a Dragon, Vintage Soul, My Soul to Keep (The Origin story of Donovan DeChance) and Kali’s Tale – book IV of the series. Also included are the bonus novellas “The Not Quite Right Reverend Cletus J. Diggs & The Currently Accepted Habits of Nature,” and “The Preacher’s Marsh,” both of which provide background on settings and characters that appear in Kali’s Tale. If you enjoy this book, you should read Nevermore, A Novel of Love, Loss & Edgar Allan Poe, which follows on Kali’s Tale, has a cameo from Donovan DeChance, and leads into Book V – A Midnight Dreary, currently in progress.

Heart of a Dragon: When a local houngan begins meddling with powers she may not be able to control, a turf war breaks out between the Dragons motorcycle club and the Los Escorpiones street gang—a war that threatens to open portals between worlds and destroy the city in the process. With his lover, Amethyst, his familiar, Cleo – an Egyptian Mau the size of a small bobcat –the dubious aid of a Mexican sorcerer named Martinez and the budding gifts of a young artist named Salvatore, DeChance begins a race against time, magic, and almost certain death.

Vintage Soul: When, despite the finest in natural and supernatural security, a sexy and well-loved, three hundred year old lady vampire is kidnapped right out from under her lover’s nose, Donovan is called in to investigate. There will be no ransom for the kidnap victim, and if Donovan doesn’t prevent an ancient, forbidden ritual from reaching its culmination, far more than a single vampire’s undead existence will be at stake.

My Soul to Keep: Donovan DeChance is a very private man, and he is in love. When he invites his partner and lover, Amethyst, for a quiet dinner, she has no idea of his true intention. Donovan has planned a sharing – a vision that will give her the keys to his early life – the origins of his power – and a lot more than she bargained for. Join young Donovan as he fights to keep his soul, save a town, and learn the roots of his teacher and guardian – and meet his familiar, Cleo.

Kali’s Tale: When Donovan is asked to follow in secret as a hot-headed group of young vampires set out on a ‘blood quest’ to kill the ancient who created the young vampire Kali against her will, he learns that – as usual – there is a lot more to the story than meets the eye. Through the juke joints of Beale Street in Memphis, to the depths of The Great Dismal Swamp, Donovan and his lover and partner, Amethyst, find themselves drawn along on one of the strangest quests in their long, enigmatic lives as they delve into the world of the undead, the magic of The Blues, and the very heart of alchemy both to protect their young, vampiric charges – and to prevent an ancient evil from destroying the balance of power in the universe.

This novel directly crosses over to the original series O.C.L.T. – where Donovan is a sometimes consultant. It features appearances by Geoffrey Bullfinch and Rebecca York, O.C.L.T. agents, as well as Old Mill, North Carolina’s own Cletus J. Diggs.

Amazon’s New Kindle Unlimited Payment Plan Explained Rationally

2012-12-23 14.51.38 (Shadeauxland's conflicted copy 2013-01-02)

NOW THAT THE BIRD HAS YOUR ATTENTION… Listen up.

First off – I wish theoretically honest, up-front bloggers and journalists who don’t use Amazon as a publishing platform or – in most cases – even write books – would quit splashing alarmist headlines all over the net ‘explaining’ how Amazon is now going to give your work away for free and it’s the end of books.  I’m going to use bullet points and make this as quick and clear as I can.

1) The new payment plan Amazon just unveiled does not affect your books that are available for “sale” on Amazon at all.  It only affects books that have been published exclusively on Amazon as part of their Kindle Select and Kindle Unlimited Plans, and of those books, only the Kindle Unlimited books.  Any book that is just “bought” on Amazon is being paid exactly as it always was.

2) An upfront note.  It is a bad idea for most books to publish them exclusively on Amazon, and the Kindle Select program is only a good idea if you have a title that has proven itself to sell very well on Amazon and not so well anywhere else.  Out of the 1200 titles we currently have at Crossroad Press – we have maybe 8 in those programs.  Even those that ARE part of the program still generate a lot of sales each month, and those sales are paid at the same royalty rate they have always been.  Only when someone who has paid for a Kindle Unlimited Subscription “borrows” the book does the new plan come into affect.

3) The plan itself: If someone borrows your book, they have a particular amount of time to read it.  Amazon will monitor whether they actually read all of it, or part of it, and pay you for the number of pages (determined by a pretty generous algorithm, I can add, because I know that a book we published that was 500 pages in print has figured to 815 pages in their formula) that are read.  There is a pot of money – just like there has always been for Kindle Unlimited – but instead of paying you each time someone borrows your book, they are paying you for the number of pages read each time someone borrows your book.

4) The purpose is to stop scammers who have been gaming this system.  Everyone is upset that they think their share will drop, but honestly, a huge number of the borrows up to now have been people cheating you out of your money.  They upload a ten page pamphlet – or ten of them – and then have 100 friends borrow it – while they do the same for those 100 friends.  Every time that ten page pamphlet is borrowed, it gets the same share as a 500 page book by a talented author.  Also, there are tons of very short stories of questionable quality being uploaded just because numbers count in this game.  If you – instead of an 80-100k word book – write ten 1500 word stories – you can get an equal share every time one of those stories is borrowed – or you could. Now, you can still write them, but your share will be proportionate to the words and effort invested.

5) Quality of the offerings being borrowed is going to improve.  Good writers aren’t worried about people borrowing their books and quitting on page five.  People paying a subscription price are going to READ the books they borrow to get their money’s worth.  This system is better in every way than the previous system. It is not Amazon trying to cheat authors, it’s Amazon protecting authors from people trying to cheat the system.  Don’t get me wrong, I think Amazon is out for Amazon, but they aren’t – in this case anyway – doing it at your expense.

6) Most important thing.  The Kindle Select and Kindle Unlimited programs are not right for most books.  As I stated above, only about 8 of our 1200 titles are in these programs.  They are there because they have consistently sold above average numbers on Amazon, whlie selling next to nothing anywhere else.  MOST books do not benefit from losing Barnes & Noble, Apple, Google, Kobo and all the other possible outlets.  IF YOUR BOOK IS NOT REGISTERED IN THE PROGRAMS THIS CHANGE MEANS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO YOU.  NOTHING.  ZILCH.  That is the most important thing.  I’ve seen articles all over the net in theoretically trusted outlets and found that – without really checking their sources, they’ve cut a few lines from Amazons announcement and not applied them to the bigger picture – then splashed click-bait headlines all over about how Amazon is now only going to pay you a tiny amount per page – as if that was all of Amazon and not a single, exclusive program that you have to opt into to even be involved in.

I hope this helps clear some of the clouds from this issue… and I hope that – if you read this – you will think twice before sharing or retweeting one of the misleading and misinformed articles prophesizing the end of books because of this policy.  No one has even been paid under the new policy and already everyone is depressed, giving up writing, etc… I suggest you spend less time on blogs and FB and more time writing – it’s easier on your heart and mind.

-DNW

 

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