John Rosenman – Quietly Awesome for Decades

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I wanted to take a day out today and direct you all to a friend and colleague of mine, Dr. John B. Rosenman.  John and I met at a writing group long ago in Virginia Beach.   We were two of the members of the group who wrote horror – most of the others were (at the time) fantasy and Sci-fi oriented, and the whole shooting match was led by the talented and (often) wise Mr. Richard Rowand, who eventually edited STARSHORE Magazine and published my first important story.

Anyway…through those years, and all of those between (decades) John has been writing stories and novels and finding them homes.  He may be the single most dedicated writer I’ve ever met.  He’s always working on a story, reworking an idea, searching for flaws where too many other writers would hit send and move on…and he has produced some remarkable stories.  He has appeared in literally hundreds of magazines and anthologies, and has a number of novels to his credit, and I’m hoping this little nudge will encourage you to check some of them out.

I will point you specifically at two Sci-Fi novels that we have published at Crossroad Press.  Both of these were previously published, but we were fortunate enough to pick them up.  John writes novels on a sweeping scale.  There are messages and socially significant sub-themes in his alien cultures, and deep emotional insights in his romance.  While they qualify, probably, as space opera, they go beyond that.  Here are the two we’ve published to date.  Read them and let me know if I’m not right!

A SENSELESS ACT OF BEAUTY

Aaron Okonkwo, a Nigerian scientist, travels with a crew in the 24th century to evaluate Viridis, which proves to be a beautiful and fabulous world. There, Aaron discovers a strange, alien species and amazing machines and technology left in a vast underground complex by a mysterious race called the Creators.

Aaron soon falls under the irresistible, seductive spell of Nightsong, a green alien female with ominous and bewitching powers. However, an even greater danger rises. He will be forced to fight for the planet’s survival against a ruthless invasion of many ships to conquer and enslave the planet – just as Africa itself was once enslaved. Aaron knows it’s A Senseless Act of Beauty to try to reclaim his ancient warrior heritage and fight back against such overwhelming odds, but he knows he must try.  – $2.99

ALIEN DREAMS

Killer angels are roaming outer space looking for their messiah. If Captain Latimore can’t make them believe he’s the one, everyone on his crew – and many more besides – will die.

Captain Eric Latimore leads a four-person crew to Lagos to investigate a previous team’s mysterious disappearance. Once there, he discovers that an ominous alien presence is invading their dreams. Each member of his crew has the same dream – huge, seductively beautiful “angels” speak to them telepathically.

The creatures strand his crew on the planet and only Latimore can free them – if he survives.  $2.99.

-DNW

My Soul to Keep – The Origin of Donovan DeChance

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I have been writing about Donovan DeChance for quite some time now.  I wrote the novel Vintage Soul years ago during Nanowrimo and it was picked up by Gale / Five Star for their horror fantasy line.  Unfortunately, when that line died, and they moved it to their mystery line, something got mixed up…I think a total of 60 copies of the HC sold, and my agent managed to wrangle the rights back out of them.  In the meantime, however, I’d written the second book in the series, “Heart of a Dragon,” and the way it played out, chronologically, that second book became the first.  When I released them through Crossroad Press, first as eBooks, and then as unabridged audiobooks, Heart of a Dragon was BOOK I and Vintage Soul was Book II.  There was one standard wish among readers and fans, and I think (hope) I have made it come true.

Just released is the novella “My Soul to Keep,” the Origin of Donovan DeChance.  In this story, we return to Rookwood, setting of the novel Hallowed Ground, in the year 1842, when Donovan was 16.  If that is confusing – read the book – all is explained, including how Donovan came to meet Cleopatra, the Egyptian Mau who is his famiilar.  Also explained is a bit how Donovan became the man, and mage, that he is – and also a little of how Rookwood, the town, became the setting for Hallowed Ground.

This novella will help tide readers over as I finish up “Kali’s Tale,” which will be the third full-length novel in the DeChance Chronicles.

I hope you’ll read it – review it – love it (I do) – and come back for more.  My Soul to Keep is available now at Crossroad Press, Smashwords, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble – and more to come, including the unabridged audiobook.

-DNW

The 414,000 Words of November – A Nanowrimo Retrospective

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Nanowrimo Kitteh Finkz  Time To Writez Wiff Osmosis

I started participating in NANOWRIMO – Officially National Novel Writing Month, in 2004.  I don’t even want to think about everything that has happened to me since then, or to my career, because it would make my head explode, and nobody wants that.  I’m going to concentrate just on what I’ve accomplished during one 30 day period a month over the years.  More than 400,000 words of fiction.  Of the seven years I’ve completed the Nanowrimo challenge, I have completed six novels.  The seventh, Gideon’s Curse, is still on the hard drive, and as soon as I’m certain all of the timeline issues I created for myself have been dealt with, I will complete that one too.  This year, this evening, actually, I will add at least 50,000 more words to the pile, bringing the total to just under 465,000 words.  Approaching half a million, and most of them published.

I see a lot of writers – and some journalists who like to write about writing but haven’t done much to show they know what they are talking about – go on rampages against Nanowrimo.  Rushing ahead, they say, is against the spirit of the “craft”.  Not everyone should write a novel just because they can, etc.  I say to all of them…Meh.   This simple competition with no prize has helped me, year after year, to regain my focus, to produce finished products I’m proud of…and I wanted to take a moment to revisit those success stories.

 

2004: The Mote in Andrea’s Eye – entire novel completed in November…and sold later that same year to Gale / Five Star.  This book went through a hardcover, a trade paperback, and a large print edition with Five Star and is now a successful eBook – soon to be an unabridged audiobook. 

Critics said:  “Tugging heartstrings with the expertise of a master puppeteer, Wilson, a former naval technician, adds plenty of authentic touches but never overwhelms the reader with details. The clean prose, romance and fantasy elements, heart-pounding scenes of man against nature, and topical currency (thankfully not overplayed) will appeal to a wide variety of readers…” – Publisher’s Weekly

2005: Vintage Soul – which started as the first of the DeChance Chronicles and became Volume II in the digital rebirth.  Also sold the same year it was finished to Gale / Five Star.  This series is currenly one of the most popular things I write.  This is available as an eBook and as an unabridged audiobook narrated by Corey Snow.  

Critics said: “This clever urban fantasy is packed with solid writing and filled with crisp details. Wilson is a whiz at painting with words. Below is a description of a ritual gone very wrong when an inept practitioner fails to control the demon he has raised.” – Patricia’s Vampire Notes

2006: This is the yet-to-be-finished Gideon’s Curse, which follows two timelines – an undead uprising on a cotton plantation outside Old Mill, N

C in the 1950s / 1960s – and a preacher, persecuted for bringing his teachings to
the slaves of that same plantation just after the Civil War.   While this book  has yet to see print,  a novella has been carved from it’s bones – The Preacher’s Marsh, which HAS been published as an eBook, and was featured in my huge short story collection from Dark Regions Press, Ennui, & Other States of Madness.

The Critics haven’t said much about it yet….

2007: The Orffyreus Wheel – This is one of several aborted projects I worked on for a previous agent who never, in the end, could get excited about anything I wrote.  I wonder if she understands how close she came to killing my career?  Anyway…this is another twin-timeline story.  It covers the life of Johann Bessler, who invented a perpetual motion wheel in the 1700s, and his ancestor who inherits the secret, and a grim battle to provide the world

with free energy.  This is available as an eBook and an unabridged Audiobook.

Critics said: “With the Orffyreus Wheel, David combines the same effortless pace of a good tale as he does with Ancient Eyes, but also manages to interweave two distinct stories – both of which share the same breathless excitement and wonder of their central characters. ” – Reader Review – Amazon.com

2008: Hallowed Ground – written with Steven Savile.  This novel, out now in trade paperback and eBook, due soon in unabridged audio, narrated by the talented Joe Geoffrey, is one of the works I am most proud of in all the years of my writing career.  It is a good western, I think, complex and layered, and accessible on many levels.  I had a blast working on this with Steve, and it was even more fun as we did it over Nanowrimo and allowed folks to

read along – which I’ve done almost every year.  This book is just now gaining in popularity, and I have high hopes for it…

Critis said: “Steven Savile and David Niall Wilson have produced a fine entry in the burgeoning Weird Western genre. Elegantly written, bristling with action and drama, HALLOWED GROUND is intelligent, thought-provoking, and highly entertaining. Readers of both Westerns and horror novels shouldn’t miss it!” — James Reasoner, author of REDEMPTION, KANSAS

2009:  Heart of a Dragon – Book I of the DeChance Chronicles.  Born of a short story written a very long time ago, this is a tale of a young artist, an old Mexican Magician, bike gangs, and of course, Donovan DeChance.  I love writing the books in this series – like the characters, and the city of San Valencez that I’ve visited so many times in my work…This book, like Vintage Soul, is available in eBook and unabridged audiobook, narrated by Corey Snow, who will (I hope) remain the voice of the series.  Both books will be available this year in trade paperback.

Critics said:  “Set in and around the dark and brooding Barrio of San Valencez, this tale weaves mysticism and action with a decided Hispanic twist. From the very beginning, when the rival Dragon and Escorpiones clans fight in Santini Park, you know the tale has far more to it than meets the eye. What brings the tale together is its underlying themes of Honour, Loyalty, Courage and Dark Ambition.” – Reader Review – Amazon.com

This year, I started out doing the next Donovan DeChance novel, Kali’s Tale, which has Donovan and his lover Amethyst looking after the young pack of vampires from Vintage Soul as they journey to The Great Dismal Swamp in search of on of their creators – to destroy him.  He is, of course, more than they bargained for – and Donovan will have his hands full.  This novel is also the first direct link between the DeChance Chronicles, and the O.C.L.T. novel series.  There are cameo appearances from Geoffrey Bullfinch, of novella The Temple of Camazotz, and Rebecca York, from my novel The Parting.  Interestingly, this year’s novel was to include a short flashback that told the story of Donovan’s origins – and that blossomed into a 21k novella of it’s own…  Today I will put the cap on the 50,000 words for 2011 and will continue on to see how many I can get before the 30th…

This is my thank you to all the folks who encouraged me, Chris Baty (no longer in charge) at Nanowrimo who tempted me and then prodded me and even helped promote me as my novels became successful.  Trish, who loves me, my kids who support everything I do, my agent Bob Fleck who has been there through all the Nanowrimo years – my collaborator Steve, and all those of you who have bought and read my books.  To the naysayers of Nanowrimo, I again say – Meh.  I’d say this post speaks for itself.

Nanowrimo Kitteh  Iz All Writed out

-DNW

Nanowrimo and Story Updates

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I make daily updates on the official Facebookpage about what’s going on with the Nanowrimo writing…but I figured I’d sort it out here at a little more length for those who might be (understandably) getting confused.

THE PLAN: Write the next Donovan DeChance novel – Kali’s Tale.  This novel is the story of the young female vampire who was part of Vein’s posse in the novel Vintage Soul.  She was brought “to the blood” violently and against her will, and as her rage builds, she is called to perform what the vampires of my little universe call “the blood quest” – in which she travels back to North Carolina to destroy the one who created her.  Naturally, these usually go south, as the creator is older, faster, stronger…thus she is not going alone.  She is accompanied by Vein, Bruno, and Bones.  Still, as it turns out, her creator is not just old … he is nearly ancient.  Top that off with a few other secrets he hasn’t shared with the world, and you get classic “imbalance” in the universe… but wait!  That makes it a job for…Donovan Dechance.

Donovan and Amethyst head off to NC to sort of look on from the shadows and help when they can.  Along the way Amethyst and the young vampires run into a problem in Memphis Tennessee, and Donovan makes a side trip to consult with an old friend, Geoffrey Bullfinch, who has recently become a full-fledged agent of the newly formed O.C.L.T. – thus tying the two worlds together.

That was the plan.

The PROBLEM with the plan was that in the first few chapters I planned a short flashback where Donovan would finally reveal his past to Amethyst – how he became who, and what he is, and why.  This, of course, turned into a lot more than a quick flashback.  It turned into a 21,000 word novella that I cut OUT of Kali’s Tale and will publish first, and separately.   The rough of that is finished, and I’m now 20k or so into Kali’s Tale proper, with all the primary characters finally getting on the road and leaving San Valencez behind.

For those of you worried about it, do not fear.  I will be finishing up Killer Green very shortly as well – at least the rough draft – and then (hopefully) Tattered Remnants – a long-time project that has been sitting too long.  Somewhere in there I will find time to edit all of these.  Welcome to the world where time ran out and we keep going anyway.

At 41,000 words for the month…the end of Nanowrimo is in site.

Onward!

Quick Update Heading into Veteran's Day

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Which is, for those who care, my day to share with hundreds of thousands of others who served.  It’s something I’m proud of…so…that’s my thought for the day.  I’m glad my country has a day to celebrate those of us who sacrificed years of our lives…

Currently reading:  City of Knives – Unpublished (until I publish it) novel by International bestselling author William Bayer.  VERY good book, with tango, and nazi weapons collectors, and mystery in Buenos Aries … good stuff.

Currently listening to : The Sufferer’s Song – by Steven Savile, narrated by Andrew Randall

 

Currently writing : Kali’s Tale – or I will be after I write the final chapter tonight of the origin story of Donovan DeChance.  For those Donovan lovers out there, and those who WANT to be…this is must-read entertainment.

So…back to it.  Miles to go before we sleep…

-DNW

Donovan DeChance … Origins

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This year I started out Nanowrimo (Wordcount just over 20k for those keeping track) working on the next novel in the Donovan DeChance series, which was to be “Kali’s Tale,” the story of one of the young vampires in Vintage Soul setting off for a town near The Great Dismal Swamp to kill the one who created her.  Along the way, I decided I wanted a flashback for Donovan.  It would be, I said, the short story of how he became who, and what he is – a back-story filler for those who love that sort of thing.  I hit the right spot in the book, started the flashback, and danged if it didn’t spin out of control…

For one thing, I’m writing the flashback with no more of an outline than a brief synopsis.  This freed me up to add in a lot of details.  That turned what was to be a chapter, maybe two, into five, and then six.  I chose a familiar setting for the story – the western town of Rookwood, but before the days of Hallowed Ground.  In fact, SIlas Boone is a boy, as is the eight-fingered piano player McGraw.  There is still life and love and mystery in the town.  In Hallowed Ground it’s the dying husk of a settlement that’s purpose – supplying things to those traveling west – had left it all but a ghost town.  In 1842, it was very much alive.

I’ve answered a lot of questions.  Donovan’s age.  How he met Cleo, his familiar…why he does what he does, and how he discovered it…this has opened up a hundred years of adventures I can come back to, while maintaining the modern-day line of books simultaneously.

Kali’s Tale will likely not include this flashback.  It’s simply too long.  It will be either a short novel on it’s own, or a novelette, and it will be released before the new year.  Kali’s Tale I return to in a day or two, once this “flashback” that became a book is in the can.  I’ll leave you with a short excerpt…

The old wagon smelled of sweat, leather, cheap liquor, and a miasma of spices, herbs, and chemicals that would have driven a bloodhound crazy.  Donovan leaned back into a pile of old rags and tried to peer out through the crack between two of the wagon’s warped boards at the passing countryside.  He knew they were getting close.  Whenever they neared a town, or a settlement, Rathman picked up the pace.  The two old ponies scented fresh apples and hay, and the old man scented whiskey and women.  Donovan knew he would work long into the night, but hoped, in the end, it would mean a hot meal.  Sometimes, if he could keep his distance from Rathman and find an hour’s work sweeping, or scrubbing, or shoveling out a stable, he could earn a decent meal before the old man’s screeching, bullying voice dragged him back to the wagon.  At least it was something to hope for.

The town they expected to run up on next was called Rookwood.  Donovan had never seen the place, but Rathman remembered it from many years back.  Donovan hoped it was a lot of years, because the old fraud was seldom welcomed back to a place a second time if anyone remembered his previous visit, and it wasn’t easy to forget.  For one thing, the decrepit old wagon was painted over with brilliant, garish designs.

“Dr. Hugo Rathman, Healer, Mystic, and Clairvoyant” was painted dead center in paint so bright and so red that circling buzzards had mistaken it for blood more than once and spiraled down to have a closer look.  More than once Donovan had peered out into the driver’s seat of the wagon to be certain the carrion feeders weren’t after Rathman himself.  The old man could drink himself into a death-like stupor so deep that he seemed dead.

Finally they passed by the first small grouping of board and tar shacks.  Donovan caught sight of a think boy with wild hair and no shirt.  For just a second he’d have sworn the kid met his gaze, right through the boards.  A second later, the boy was off, flying barefoot across the desert toward town.  Apparently visitors weren’t common in Rookwood.  Donovan frowned.  The rarer they were, the more likely someone would remember Rathman.  It was possible that the old man hadn’t cheated anyone on his last visit, but that would make this a rare visit indeed.  At least three lawmen were watching out for the wagon because ill townsfolk had taken one or more of Rathman’s potions and either fallen deeper into their illness, or died outright – poisoned.

Whatever the situation, Rathman didn’t hesitate.  He aimed the wagon dead-center down the main road of the town, bumping through potholes and jarring Donovan’s teeth with each jouncing yard they progressed.  The wagon creaked and moaned, but it held together.  It always managed to hold together.  Like Rathman, it seemed there was no force on the road or in the desert that could put the final nail in its coffin.

“You ready, boy” Rathman grated, turning so that his unshaven face, wild dark hair and red-veined eyes glared back into the shadows.  There was no way he could see into the interior, but he still managed to stare directly into the particular shadows where Donovan rested.

“Yes sir,” Donovan said.

Rathman stared a moment longer, then nodded.   He turned back to the reins, steered around a corner a bit too quickly, nearly tilting the wagon up on two wheels, and a moment later they came to a halt.  Donovan rose, stepping up to the front of the wagon and peering out around the edge.

It was an alley between what looked to be a stable, and a taller wooden building that might have been a saloon or hotel.  Rathman dropped the reins, stood, and stretched, pressing his knuckles tightly into the lower half of his back.  He’d been sitting in the same position for nearly thirty miles, and Donovan knew it would take more than an hour for the stoop to leave him.

“I’m goin’ to see about getting the horses taken in,” he said.  “You get this wagon ready – hear?  We’ll be settin’ up in the morning, and there’s no time for delays.”

Rathman seemed to drop almost into a trance then, as if listening to a voice Donovan couldn’t hear.  Then he turned back.

“Put out the books, and the rheumatism tinctures.  Arrange some of the other cures behind.  Then get this place presentable and set up my table.  I believe the spirits might just speak to me here. There’s something in the air.”

Donovan thought that all there was in the air was dust.  He thought, very briefly, of his father, sickly and barely able to carry himself to work in a mine so dark and deep it swallowed men whole.  He thought of his mother, though he could barely remember her face.  He thought of the tiny room that had been his, the bed that had grown too short to contain his long, lanky legs, and he sighed.  At that moment, he’d have traded half his life to be back there, caring for his father – assuming the old man hadn’t passed on – and getting ready to take his own turn in the mines.

“Apprentice,” was the title he’d been granted so long ago.  “Assistant to a man of books and medicine.  A learned scholar with the ear of the spirits and the mind of a professor.  What it had boiled down to was the life of an indentured manservant.  He’d learned to read, but only by his own dogged effort, and stolen moments with Rathman’s precious books.  When he proved he could earn a dime or two by reading from the old tales to those who passed by, the good “doctor” had taken an interest and taught what he could between drunken binges and fits of curse-spewing malevolence.  He was obviously torn between the fear of teaching too much and having Donovan run off on his own, and the greedy desire for his apprentice to be able to shoulder a share of the burden of making their living.  It was also true that no listener had ever asked for their money back, or threatened to run Donovan out of town on a rail, and likely Rathman held that against him too.

Audible – ACX – Thoughts

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 We recently moved most of the Crossroad Press audiobook operation onto the Audible ACX system.  This is a very cool interface that allows rights holders, narrators, and producers, and authors to collaborate on audiobook projects.  It is easy to sign in and be a part of things, but it is also easy to take that ease for granted.  Here’s rule #1.  No matter which role you sign in to fulfill, you still have to know what you’re doing.  Not all books are eligible for ACX.  Not just any old Skype microphone plugged into your laptop with a USB cord is going to make you a narrator.  There are other considerations…but I’m going to bulletize most of them, and then give a couple of reasons why having your book done through a company like Crossroad Press – even on ACX – might still be a better option than going it alone.

1. Narration is an art.  It requires an ability to act.  It isn’t the same thing as a live reading at a convention, and it isn’t the same thing as a radio broadcast or a podcast.  It has to be learned, and if you go in with the arrogant notion you can just “do it” you probably won’t get many jobs.  As a rights holder and publisher you have to be familiar enough with audiobooks to tell the difference, and to choose a voice that will benefit your project.

2.  Sound quality is very important.  Your book will be competing for sales with professional studios in the market place.  If someone spends a membership credit on Audible, or plops down the money to buy your book, and it’s full of background noise, computer fans, humm, or barkind dogs they aren’t coming back, and you’ll end up with some bad reviews.

3. Presentation matters.  Cover art, the intro and outro to the book, and the marketing copy are important pieces of the whole project, and should not be ignored.

4. Note to narrators. The audition script isn’t optional.  If you run through ACX and drop your professional demo tape in on a thousand jobs, my guess is you’ll get zero.  Take the time to scope out projects that are right for you.  Study the script provided and submit an audition that is appropriate and that demonstrates how you are right for “that” book.

Specific to ACX is the royalty share option.  I’ve seen sides being drawn on this issue recently.  Here’s the thing…while it takes a good bit of time to narrate and edit the audio for a book…as an author I can tell you it takes a good deal of time and work to write the book, and some to publish it as well.  Authors and publishers have always had to wait for sales and made their money from royalties.  In the new publishing paradigm, I can see this shift happening for voice talent as well.  Over time, as you develop a body of work, you begin to receive royalties on all of them each pay period, and it develops into a revenue stream.  If you are paid up front, it’s also a gamble.  Say you do a project for $150-$200 a finished hour, and you sit back to watch the book sell ten thousand copies.  A royalty share contract would include you in that success…and honestly, it seems to me it would give you the incentive to do an even better job on the book.  On the other hand, if the book is by an unknown author, the up-front payment might be the way to go.  It’s always a gamble, but at least in a royalty share it’s a shared gamble.

My last point here, before I link to a few of our ACX titles, is that there is still value in having someone like Crossroad Press handle your book.  For one thing, we work with our own established sound engineer.  This adds a level of quality control most authors and agents just aren’t qualified to add on their own, unless they happen to be sound engineers on the side.  We provide good quality cover art.  We have an established market, growing every day, that draws people to our new titles.  These are important, but here’s a kicker.

There are two awards important to audiobooks.  The Audie, which is issued by the APA … and the golden earphone, which you get through reviews in Audiofile Magazine.  WE have an established arrangement to get our titles into the review process at Audiofile.  We are members of the APA.  The only way to nominate a work for the Audie is to pay the APA for each nomination, and even as a member we pay $100 a title for those that are included.  This can be very important step in getting people to listen to your book.

None of this is to say that you can’t sign onto ACX and make your own book…you can, of course, and if you are careful, pay attention, and listen to advice, you can probably make a quality book.  On the other hand, if you’re a writer, you can get someone like Crossroad Press to handle it, and get on with writing, because the biggest problem form writers in this new digitized world is that most of the advice tells you to do everything yourself.  It can really cut into your writing time if you aren’t a full-time, stay at home writer, and even then it calls for several unique skill-sets  Publishers aren’t dead…they just have to change.  Crossroad Press has been dedicated from day one to giving most of the money to the people who create the stories.  Being an author, that’s important to me.

If you’d like to check out what we’ve been doing through ACX…you can find all of our ACX titles here:

CROSSROAD PRESS & ACX

Here are links to a few of our titles: Just  click the images.

 
 

Updates – it's About Time

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It’s been a really long time since I posted here.  I know this, because this blog posts on to my Amazon author’s page, and they sent me a note saying if I didn’t start updating soon they would deactivate it.  This is what happens when you diversify and spread out too far.  This has always been my personal bully-pulpit, and also the place I focused on updates to my own writing.  It will be that again.

Currently I’m novelizing KILLER GREEN – the first ever screenplay conceived on Twitter, posted as blog-posts, starring Twitter celebrities (and others) and then optioned right back there on Twitter.  It’s not produced yet, of course, but we all know how those things go.  It’s still “in the works,” and I’m ever hopeful.

In the tradition of this particular story, if you want to read along as I write it, I set up a blog.  The chapter posts are private, but all you have to do to read along is register and login.  I have fifteen chapters posted so far, and I’m well into the next one, so get on over and catch up at the KILLER GREEN READ-ALONG BLOG.

My novel MAELSTROM is due soon for Kindle and other eReaders. I have also recovered the trade paperback rights to this title, so it will be coming out from Crossroad Press in the next year. This, of course, will join the so far unspectacular sales of other trade paperbacks we’ve done…there was a lot of grumbling about books coming out digitally that you couldn’t buy in print.  I set up the print line and priced it about five dollars cheaper than anyone else doing it…and no one is ordering.  Not a great argument for the hardcopies, but we persevere.  So far from Crossroad Press you can get a number of books in print, including original novels from Aaron Rosenberg, Chet Williamson, myself and Steven Savile, as well as an original collection by Jo Graham.  If you buy these books straight from the Crossroad Press store, you will receive the eBook for free with your purchase.  Many are also available in audio (with more to come)

All of this, of course, is available through CROSSROAD PRESS and also on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

My collection The Call of Distant Shores is getting some attention now, and my most recent novel is also available, The Parting, the first full-length book in the new O.C.L.T. series.

More specific updates to come, and I’ll be fleshing out the books pages.

-DNW

My Novel MAELSTROM up for Pre-order

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BAD MOON BOOKS is about to release my novel MAELSTROM in trade paperback, and a very limited hardcover edition.  The hardcover will be printed only in the quantities ordered during the reservation period.  A few of those who pre-order the HC limited will win copies of a a hand-bound story set in Lavender, California, where the action in the novel takes place.  It is POSSIBLE that those people will have their names included in the story as well.  It is PROBABLE that no more than five or six copies will ever exist…anything is possible.  Details will be released as I have them, but for now … Go pre-order the book!

Signed, Limited HC : $55

Trade Paperback:  $18

 

Cover art by the talented Alex McVey

Something in Lavender, California is waking up. Rituals not properly completed for centuries are coming together. Nothing is what it seems.

When Nick Leatherman, his girlfriend Ruthie, and their buddies Flash and Weasel invade Shady Grove Cemetery for a “ghost hunt” on their way home from a concert, they are drawn into a web of darkness and intrigue that threatens to consume them. Nick and Ruthie witness a gruesome murder, and Nick’s pocketknife shows up at the crime scene the next morning. Nick has had problems in the past, and Inspector Kendall Straker remembers. He remembers Ned Leatherman, Nick’s alcoholic step-father as well, and he doesn’t believe the boy is a killer. The problem is that the knife – emblazoned with the name of the band Maelstrom – is the only clue he has.

Horace Goldbough is the local pastor. He’s built a huge following and a beautiful church, but there are things about the good reverend that the town doesn’t know. In particular there is his relationship with a dark woman named Beauchane, and a certain book he keeps hidden from the world.

With local reporters, and a television talk-show host hounding his every step, Straker attempts to unravel the series of grisly killings terrorizing Lavender, while simultaneously protecting Nick. Nick, in the meantime, has begun his own investigation, feeling trapped and needing to clear his name.

Ritual words are being spoken, and a power that has been denied access to the Earth for centuries is poised to strike. The clock is ticking. Can Straker, Nick, and Maelstrom find the answer to the killings and put an end to them before the final ritual takes place, or will a horror be unleashed on the unsuspecting town of Lavender beyond their comprehension?

The Writing of the Novel Deep Blue

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The novel Deep Blue finds its origin in the novelette by the same name published in an anthology titled Strange Attraction.  In Strange Attraction, all the stories were inspired by the “Kinetic” Art of Lisa Snelling, each author choosing one of the characters on an intricately detailed Ferris wheel sculpture.  I was honored to be among authors such as Neil Gaiman and Gene Wolfe in presenting our separate visions of what lay buried behind her art.  From the images presented, I chose a harlequin, hanging by a noose from the bottom of one of the Ferris wheels seats.  I took the image, made it the wallpaper on my computer, printed it out and carried it around with me, and let it sink in.  I could have written any number of stories that would have sufficed, but somehow I knew there would be more to this work, and so I waited.

The publishers of the anthology, Vince and Leslie Harper, invited me to have dinner with them one night when my mundane job took me to Washington DC.  We met for Mexican food and went together to see the movie PI which, at the time, was newly released.  On the way to meet the Harpers, I walked down into a shadowed subway, and I was assaulted by some of the most haunting saxophone music I’ve ever heard.  It bordered the blues, walked down old jazz roads, and I never saw the musician.  That set the mood for what was to come.

I reached the restaurant without further incident, and we spent a pleasant hour scalding mouths and stomachs with jalapenos and washing them down with beer.  Then came the movie.  I won’t go into detail about PI, but I’ll say it’s a black and white film, very surreal, filled with symbolism, and it left me visually and emotionally stunned.  I parted company with Vince and his wife, found my way back to the subway and my hotel, and called it a night.

The next day, a friend of mine and I set out to visit The Holocaust Museum.  I have always wanted to see it, but I was not prepared for the intensity of the images, the displays, and the words I would find in that short hour visit.  I purchased a book of poetry written by the victims, and left with so much bottled up inside from those two days that I thought it would be the end of my sanity.

That night, I started to write.  I started to write about The Blues, and how deep they might really get.  I wrote about pain, not my pain, but the pain bottled up inside the world, as the pain had been bottled up inside me, and I wrote a way out.  That was Brandt, his guitar, and his blues.  The story, like the pain, refused to be bottled up in just the few lines of that novelette, and so I released it into the novel you now hold.

Everyone comes to their crossroads eventually – the defining moment of life.  As Old Wally, one of the novel’s main characters tells us – “Crossroads, or the crosshairs.”  Forward or back, but you can’t stay stagnant – that way lies madness.  I give you . . . Deep Blue.

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