Posts tagged influences

Writing What Hurts – Part the 7th (I think)

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A lot of people join the military.  There are myriad reasons for this – adventure, to see the world, to take some time and figure out whether you want college, and what you want from it.  All of those are good, valid reasons.  None of them were mine.  I spent most of my life in a small town, not fitting in all that well at school and trying to find ways to deal with the abusive, alcoholic step-father life dealt me.

No, he never beat me.  He did launch me off the ground with a broom once, but I thoroughly deserved that.  My brother and I had been considering getting into an old oil barrel and rolling down a steep hill toward the lake below…  Bob – never dad – was a big man.  He had his own issues – raised in the depression on or near an Amish farm.  Grew up to serve as a police officer and (I believe) a pilot for a while in a non-wartime military.  When I met him, he was a barber.

I have never understood the relationship he and my mother shared.  She seemed to spend most of her life in trying not to make him angry, while sneaking behind his back to see that my brother and I had some kind of life of our own beyond him.  Bob’s idea of how our days should be spent was in going to school – only because we had to – coming home – and working.  He was always working on something, a glass of Seagram’s 7 and 7-Up in one hand and a cheap, stinking cigar in the other.  We were expected to be part of it.  He could build things.  He could fix cars.  He could fly a plane, and even taught my mom to do it.  What he could not do was – in any way at all – relate to people other than his few old friends, and though he seemed to get along well with his own son, he was pathetically inept at dealing with me, or my brother.

After very, very long hours of thought, my brother and I have come to the conclusion he was possibly gay, and just never had the courage to come out of the closet.  He and my mom slept in different rooms.  He insulated his with cork and air-conditioned it to near freezing.  Most of the jokes he made were off-color and inappropriate.  He was prejudiced to a fault, and when the family (on the rare occasions we were allowed out of our bedroom) watched Archie Bunker, Bob laughed with Archie while the rest of us laughed at them both.  Bob was Archie Bunker and proud of it.  He had more ethnic slurs memorized than I do 70s and 80s pop songs, and that is one of my super powers.

I remember one winter how he sent us out to shovel snow off the driveway.  Not a bad thing, in and of itself, though we were not very old or large or strong.  Here’s the thing, though.  It was still snowing.  By the time we hit the end of the drive (which was long) it was covered again.  Southern Illinois in winter is VERY cold.  Our toes were near frostbite.  We did this for HOURS and he would not let us stop, or come in.  On top of it all – he owned a 12 hp tractor with a snow plow, and when we were finished…then he went out and plowed it after the snow stopped.  This is the type of thing that happened any time he was given control of the situation, so – for our own survival – we found ways to avoid as much contact with him as humanly possible.

I remember one day, out in the sun, not allowed to get a drink, trying to hold sheets of particle board siding against the wall without letting them move as he stood back and cocked his head, drank his beer, or whiskey, and took his sweet time deciding to nail it into place.  We were so tired – so hot.  At some point, I had a spade in my hand.  I don’t remember what job required that, but there it was.  In those few short moments, I remember considering slamming it into the back of his head repeatedly, and taking my chances – as a juvenile – in the system. I truly, truly hated him.  I was told I would get over that when I grew up.  I never did, though I came to sort of pity him and the anger drained away.

Later in life, to show he never changed, I visited home with my first wife.  At this point, Bob and my mom slept in different halves of a duplex (reinforcing the separate room thing to a ridiculous degree).  We were in mom’s half, on a fold-out couch in her family room.  Before we woke, he came in, and sat in a chair.  Then he grinned and started talking, and very clearly thought if he waited long enough, we’d both get out from under the covers without dressing and prance around for his entertainment.  I had to get up and tell him to get out so she could dress.  The creep factor was huge. During that trip he also had a near psychotic break because, having hated anything but whole milk all of my life, I had the temerity to buy some and put it in the refrigerator. It might have been the depression years talking, but he was absolutely insanely angry about what he considered a ridiculous waste of money when Skim and 2% were cheaper. Funny the cost of whiskey never came up.

Anyway… why do I mention all of this?  Not really for therapeutic purposes, but just to show another aspect of how your life can inform your creative process.  All of the things that I blame on that man, and the life I lived before I left for the US Navy, are a part of what I’ve written, what I will write in the future, the decisions I make as a man, husband, father.  Writing is like life, when it’s done right, and the things that ache – the things that hurt – the things that drive you near the edge of madness – those are the things that give your words power – side by side with the wonder you find in the world, the love and relationships and success you encounter along the way.  These are the influences that insure you have something to say – and if you don’t – why are you writing?

You will find part of my life in those days in the childhood of Brandt, the protagonist of my fairly popular novel Deep Blue. Writing that was therapeutic.

You thought I was going to talk about boot camp, and I am.  I first escaped home by spending a lot of time in a church.  I walked in that world for a time, and when I left home, I was still mired firmly in that dream.  As I said a few pages back – in 1997 I left for the United States Navy – EVERYTHING changed.

 

What Influences My Writing? Everything – Blog Tour Moves On…

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debilI suppose I’ll get back to more normal posting soon.  I have only a few more stops on the blog tour.  I’ve been steadily working on typing in the lost Cletus J. Diggs novel from my hand-written scribbles, so progress is being made.  I’m also enjoying a stint of actual editing on an original novel that Crossroad Press will be publishing…  Always working on something.  Soon I’ll share the pretty cool trailer that narrator Tom Pile made for my novel KILLER GREEN – which is due out in unabridged audio soon.

Today’s post on this never-ending gobstopper of a book tour is about influences.  I have my own views on what influences writing, and creativity – as I do on most things.  I tried to unscramble those views and compress then into a single post.  Here’s a short snippet:

“Over the years, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are very simple answers to the most common questions asked of writers. One is, of course, where do you get your ideas.  The simple answer for that is from your influences, and from your mind. It’s collaboration between your creativity and the world that makes stories possible and the stronger the connection – the more it means to you – the more powerful those stories will be.  Everything influences your work.  Everything.

My serious writing career started during my time serving in the US Navy.  I learned to write through serious distractions, friends, music, television, constant interruptions. In those early days, music was as much a part of my life as breathing.  It still is, but like everything in life, it’s aged, shifted, and changed.  I wrote very literally a half a million words on one cruise.  I worked from around 4:00 in the afternoon until midnight every night.  I had a transmitter room where I maintained UHF radio systems, and I moved my old 386 computer in there along with my Deskjet 500 printer and a case of paper.” – Read the Entire Post over at Rinn Reads!

THE TOUR SO FAR:

Read my guest post about Donovan DeChance at the Paranormal Book Club

Read the guest post about memorable characters, and Cletus J. Diggs and the review at Brooke Blogs. She liked it!

Read my post about romance in books over at Fierce Dolan’s Blog..

My post about why I’m glad Nevermore was not published traditionally – read it at the What Readers Want blog!

How personal and North Carolina history affect the novel – read at the FLYING HIGH blog!

Read about mining history for your fiction at Christine’s Words!

Read about the cover art by Lisa Snellings at Workaday Reads

Read the review of the book, and the guest post on keeping your series new

Read the interview at One More Chapter

Read my post about writers – and reading – at Janna Shay’s blog!

Read My post – Everybody Loves a Mystery – here in this blog!

Read my post “Let There be Magic” at the main Buy the Book Tour Site!

Read my post about “The Dark South” at The Open Book Society Blog…;

Read about Genres & Why I hate them : ==> AT THE AUTHOR’S CAFE

Listen to internet radio with BuyTheBookTours on BlogTalkRadio

READ THE Guest Post about History in fiction at MELISSA’S BLOG!

Listen to internet radio with BuyTheBookTours on BlogTalkRadio

Interview with me at the Blog of author Hywela Lin

Interview with Donovan DeChance at Laurie’s Thoughts and Reviews

Interview with Edgar Allan Poe at MJ Schiller’s Blog (join the discussion)

Get the details of the book tour – and the giveaways – at Buy the Book Tours…

BUY NEVERMORE! AT AMAZON.COM or BARNES & NOBLE or CROSSROAD PRESS

DOWNLOAD THE AUDIOBOOK FROM AUDIBLE.COM – NARRATED BY GIGI SHANE!

Writing What Hurts – Part the Third – Influences

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One of the most popular subjects among authors and those who study authors is that of influences.  It is a natural trait of those who teach writing, and those who study writing, to want to know cause and effect – to see if there is a combination of outside events and internal decisions behind the success, or lack of success, of a given writer’s work.  When I’m asked about my influences, it can send me into a tirade, or drop me back into reflective silence.  It all depends on context, and where my mind is at the moment the subject is breached.

It’s easy to get caught up in analysis.  Nobody works in a void.  Someone influenced every creative voice in history, and the two –pronged question is how much, and does it really matter?  If you ask the question directly you may get a pat answer filled with all the right names.  You may get a group of avante garde trailblazers, or a group of the most popular, financially successful authors working.  You might get movies and relatives and heroes and mentors, but what you will never get is the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.

You can interpret the question more than one way.  Who influenced me?  Well, popular authors influence me all the time; some of them because I love and devour their work, like Stephen King and John Grisham.  Others because their phenomenal popularity has struck a chord with the world, and I want to be a chord-striker too – even if I can’t get interested in their writing.  Dan Brown is a good example for me.  I know that millions of people enjoy his fiction, but for me – if it’s an influence – it’s on the choice of subject matter; I don’t care for his writing style at all.

I think the question goes much deeper than what other writers have influenced you, though.  There are things that form you as a person, and when writing is at its best – as you might gather from the title of this work – I think it is very personal.  The writing and the writer are not far removed from one another, and so, whatever influenced the formation of the writer is what influenced the writing.  Religion – philosophy – experience – relationships – all of that, and so much more.  What music do you listen to?  Why?  When did you listen to that music, and what was happening in your life.  Do you like art? What artists – what types of art – why?  Who introduced you to them, and why do they stick with you.

There are too many influences in a writer’s life to categorize them all.  I think you can break them down into categories though – or periods.  I grew up in small-town Illinois.  I was a nerdy book reader, not great at sports but participated anyway, picked on by several different groups and types of other students and friends with some great kids.  From that period I brought Vonnegut, Bradbury, Lovecraft, and Tolkein with me.  I  left behind The Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, Abraham Lincoln and Kenneth Roberts, whose historical autobiographies kept me glued to the page for days at a time and taught me the truth behind history – that it’s rewritten again and again and really just a form of fiction.  The book that set me straight told the full story of Benedict Arnold, who was far from the traitor we are taught in school.  I also left behind a ton of comic books, and somehow never re-acquired the love of reading them I had as a boy.

What came next were my US Navy years.  I brought from those Stephen King, Salvador Dali, the music of Steeleye Span and a thousand rock groups, the ability to play guitar and the first few novels of my career.  I left behind mountains of fantasy trilogies, elves, goblins, and other such critters, even as I moved to and through Dean Koontz and on to Clive Barker.  I also left behind my first publishing venture – a magazine called The Tome – the editing of which was eye-opening and deeply influential on my career, as well as my writing.

I’m cutting each of these periods far short.  I visited countries and continents in the US Navy, lived in Spain, joined a Bike Club (Tiburon MC) – visited Masada and Jerusalem, Rome and Pisa and Florence, Greece and Crete.  I loved and lost and married and divorced.  In other words, I lived – a lot.  All of that is in my writing if you look for it, though it may not be easily discernible to anyone who didn’t share all of that experience (a person, in other words, who does not exist).

You can gain absolutely nothing from huge chunks of your life and be influenced forever by just a few moments.  What you take from a book might be a short quote you can’t shake, a style of getting a particular bit of plot or information across, a conversational tic.  Stephen King’s characters often say, “I had an idea that,” or “I had the idea that,” and that sticks with me.  I haven’t used it, but I recognize it in his work and smile when I see it.

Since we’re still in the introductory part of this book, I’m going to close the door on this influence thing for a while with the note that throughout the pages of this book, the things that have influenced me will become apparent.  I’ll tell you stories.  I’ll reference other writers and talk about thing I like or do not like in their work.  I’ll say repeatedly that all opinions are subjective, and that these are just mine…something I have learned to say through the influence of Mr. Richard Rowand, editor of the late and much missed STARSHORE MAGAZINE – who published my first major genre piece, “A Candle Lit in Sunlight,” which later became the novel “This is My Blood.”  He used to tell us – right before hacking our work to bits – that we should keep in mind that all reviews are subjective.

Before I continue, I’m going to sit back and listen to some Hank Williams Senior and follow that with Charlie Johnson’s Birdland – music picked up while being influenced by Poppy Z. Brite’s novel “Drawing Blood,” though ol’ Hank was with me since my childhood (and you can read about that in my novel Deep Blue).  Onward.

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